Martha Washington Goes to War (1994)

A five-issue series published in 1994, and closely based on Ayn Rand‘s Atlas ShruggedMartha Washington Goes to War has Martha fighting for the PAX army to reunite the fractured United States. The war effort is undermined by frequent technology failures, the disappearances of America’s brightest minds, and a general malaise among the people. Washington is crippled in an attack. She’s secretly visited by Wasserstein, her old boyfriend, who heals her with unknown technology. Washington is later brought onboard PAX’s orbiting satellite Harmony. Wasserstein returns and seems to kill Coogan, Harmony’s chief engineer. Washington pursues Wasserstein’s flying craft into the radioactive wasteland in Oklahoma. She penetrates the field at the core of the wasteland, and finds a paradise. Wasserstein, Raggyann, and the missing scientists have hidden themselves here to develop technologies and strategies to improve the world. They knew PAX and the current government weren’t interested in truly improving people’s lives, so they created this sanctuary to wait until they were strong enough to overthrow the corrupt government and implement true change.

 

 

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Blade of the Immortal (1996)

Blade of the Immortal is a Japanese manga series by Hiroaki Samura. The series is set in Japan during the mid-Tokugawa Shogunate period and follows the cursed samurai Manji, who has to kill 1000 evil men in order to regain his mortality. The manga was originally published in Afternoon from June 25, 1993, to December 25, 2012. A 2008 anime television series adaptation was produced by Bee Train and Production I.G. Also in 2008, the novel Blade of the Immortal: Legend of the Sword Demon was released in Japan by Kodansha, and two years later in the United States by Dark Horse Comics. A live action film adaptation of the same name was released in 2017. A new anime adaptation has been announced.

Aliens: Earth War (1990)

Aliens: Earth War was a continuation of the events from Aliens (series 1) (1988) and Aliens (series 2) (1989), originally featuring the continuing adventures of the characters Newt and Dwayne Hicks from the film Aliens, and also reintroducing Alien-film-franchise heroine Lt. Ellen Ripley.

For later printings, after the release of the film Alien³, the story was retitled Aliens: The Female War, and the names/identities of the lead characters were changed to Billie and Wilks, since Newt and Hicks were killed off at the start of the film, and the Ellen Ripley who appears in the story is said to be a synthetic version of Ripley, who was killed off at the film’s end. As such, the story, as Aliens: The Female War, the story still stands as part of Aliens comics/novel continuity; and Billie, Wilks, and the Ellen Ripley synthetic have all become completely separate characters.

 

The Thing from Another World (1991)

The Thing from Another World is the first of the comic series published by Dark Horse Comics. The series acted as a continuation of the 1982 film The Thing, with three stories (The Thing from Another World, The Thing from Another World: Climate of Fear and The Thing from Another World: Eternal Vows) directly following its events, and a serialized visual novel (The Thing from Another World: Questionable Research) which ignored the preceding stories and acted as a separate stand-alone sequel to the film.

 

Archenemy (2006)

The 4-part series focuses on the superhero Star Fighter and his archenemy Underlord, as well as roommates Ethan and Vincent. They just happen to be the same people, though neither Ethan (Star Fighter) nor Vincent (Underlord) are aware of that fact.

Ethan and Vincent are each horrible roommates, though they are unable to give up their apartment in order to escape the other. Ethan’s a slob who likes throwing parties simply to annoy Vincent. Vincent is creepy. Vincent most likely hates Ethan more than he ever could hate Star Fighter.

At the same time as they’re fighting between each other (in both their identities), Vincent is attempting to become a member of The Masked Circle, a secret society of supervillains that both his father and brother already belong to.

Abe Sapien (2013)

Abraham Sapien, born Langdon Everett Caul, is a fictional character introduced in the comic bookseries Hellboy, created by Mike Mignola. He takes his name from “Ichthyo sapien“, the fanciful species designation chosen for him by his colleagues in the 19th-century Oannes Club, and from Abraham Lincoln, on whose assassination date the Oannes Club abandoned Abe’s body, leaving only a cryptic note as explanation, in a suspended animation tank beneath a Washington D.C. hospital. He is occasionally referred to as an “amphibious man.”

As well as regular appearances in Hellboy and B.P.R.D., Sapien has also starred in his own comics, with trade paperback collections and omnibus editions.

Comics’ Greatest World (1993)

Comics’ Greatest World was created by Team CGW. Originally conceived in 1990, it took three years for the line to be released, which led to an industry-wide perception that it was created to capitalize on the speculator mania of the early 1990s. When the mania ended, most of the titles were canceled. Ghost, one of the imprint’s more unorthodox titles, managed to survive the longest. It was canceled twice, first in early 1998, before being revived later that year and canceled again after a run of just less than two years.

All Comics’ Greatest World titles took place in a shared universe. Most of the action centered on four cities in a slightly skewed version of America: Arcadia, Golden CitySteel Harbor, and the Cinnibar Flats area of Nevada, home of an interdimensional rift called the “Vortex”.

The series started off with a story in Dark Horse Comics before kicking off in four weekly limited series, introducing the cities and characters. These were followed by several short-lived series, one-shots, and mini-series. Only a few titles lasted very long.

Around April 1995, the imprint was renamed “Dark Horse Heroes”. With the name change, the use of the city logos was also dropped.

 

Dark Horse Comics (1992)

This monthly, color anthology from 1992 featured some of the hottest properties and creators anywhere. Many of the storylines presented in the pages of Dark Horse Comics have spun off into their own monthly series.

 

The Goon – Dark Horse (2003)

The Goon is written and drawn by Eric Powell. The series mixes both a comical and violent atmosphere with a supernatural slant, which pit the titular character against undead creatures/zombies, ghosts, ghouls, mutants, skunk-apes with an unnatural hunger for pies, giant squids, mob/gang leaders, extra-dimensional aliens, mad scientists and robots.

 

 

Ghost in the Shell- Dark Horse (1995)

In this cyberpunk iteration of a possible future, computer technology has advanced to the point that many members of the public possess cyberbrains, technology that allows them to interface their biological brain with various networks. The level of cyberization varies from simple minimal interfaces to almost complete replacement of the brain with cybernetic parts, in cases of severe trauma. This can also be combined with various levels of prostheses, with a fully prosthetic body enabling a person to become a cyborg. The heroine of Ghost in the Shell, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is such a cyborg, having had a terrible accident befall her as a child that ultimately required that she use a full-body prosthesis to house her cyberbrain. This high level of cyberization, however, opens the brain up to attacks from highly skilled hackers, with the most dangerous being those who will hack a person to bend to their whims.