Give Me Liberty: An American Dream (1990)

Give Me Liberty is a four-issue mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics in 1990. It was created and written by Frank Miller and drawn by Dave Gibbons. The title of the series comes from a famous quotation by Patrick Henry: “I know not what course others may take but — as for me — give me liberty or give me death.”

Give Me Liberty was one of Frank Miller’s two creator-owned (the other was Hard Boiled) titles he took to Dark Horse after deciding to stop working for DC Comics after a dispute over a proposed ratings system.

The story is set in a dystopian near-future where the United States have split into several extremist factions, and tells the story of Martha Washington, a young American girl from a public housing project called “The Green” (see Chicago‘s Cabrini–Green). The series starts with Martha’s birth and sees her slowly grow up from someone struggling to break free of the public housing project, to being a war hero and major figure in deciding the fate of the United States.

The series was a mix of Miller’s typical action sequences as well as being a political satire of the United States and its major corporations. The series proved to be a huge success for Dark Horse and was one of the biggest selling independent comics of the time. A trade paperback was later released and Miller followed up Give Me Liberty with several sequels continuing the story. All of these sequels were drawn by Dave Gibbons and published by Dark Horse.

 

Madman Comics V1 (1994)

This is it! The all-new, all-exciting, bimonthly continuing series makes its triumphant return to the racks! Thrilling stories, brilliant art — this is the one, folks! The comic-book event of the decade! In fact, this is the comic-book series you’ll be telling your grandkids about.

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction (1993)

Before Hellboy was published independently at Dark Horse Comics, the concept was initially pitched to a board of directors for DC Comics, who loved it, but did not like the idea of it involving “Hell”.

The early stories were conceived and drawn by Mignola with a script written by John Byrne and some later stories have been crafted by creators other than Mignola, including Christopher Golden, Guy Davis, Ryan Sook, and Duncan Fegredo. The increasing commitments from the Hellboy franchise meant that the 2008 one-shot In the Chapel of Moloch was the first Hellboy comic Mignola had provided the script and art for since The Island in 2005.

Ghost (1990’s)

Ghost first appeared in Comics’ Greatest World, week three, in 1993. After a popular special in 1994, a monthly title devoted to the character began publication in 1995. It ran for 36 issues, followed by a six-month break and a second series of 22 issues. The second series was a continuation of the first with a number of changes, including new details about Ghost’s origin. The stories in both series were based in (and around) the city of Arcadia, in a self-contained fictional universe outlined in Dark Horse’s Comics’ Greatest World.

Ghost continued appearing in her own titles (and others) into the 2000s, including several crossovers unrelated to Comics’ Greatest World. Most notable among these were a two-issue crossover with Dark Horse’s Hellboy (Ghost/Hellboy), and a four-issue crossover with DC Comics’ Batgirl (Ghost/Batgirl: The Resurrection Machine). Ghost was ranked 15th on the Comics Buyer’s Guide‘s “100 Sexiest Women in Comics” list.

Star Wars – Boba Fett: Overkill (2006)

Boba Fett rockets onto the scene with blasters blazing in this stand-alone story featuring the galaxy’s greatest bounty hunter taking on a dangerous contract that proves deadly for all involved!

Summoned to settle the score between two warring factions, Fett quickly shows his employers the importance of always choosing the right tool for the job, and the folly of underestimating just how much damage and chaos a single Mandalorian can inflict. Once unleashed, Fett’s drive to finish the job is unshakable, and both groups quickly realize they’re dealing with a bigger and much deadlier mutual problem—one that must be stopped before it obliterates everything!

Star Wars: Purge (2005)

Purge is a comic book one-shot released on December 28, 2005 by Dark Horse Comics. The story was written by John Ostrander, and the art was done by Doug Wheatley. The events depicted take place in the Star Wars galaxy approximately one month after the events in Revenge of the Sith.

Flaming Carrot Comics- Dark Horse Comics (1988)

After Renegade, Burden took Flaming Carrot to Dark Horse Comics, which published 14 more issues of Flaming Carrot, #18-31 (June 1988 to Oct. 1994). Dark Horse also published Flaming Carrot stories in its anthology Dark Horse Presents #20 (Aug. 1988) and its annual anthology San Diego Comic Con Comics #1.

Star Wars: Dark Empire (1991)

Part of the Star Wars Expanded Universe, the trilogy follows events in the Star Wars franchise years after Return of the Jedi, specifically the aftereffects of Timothy Zahn‘s Thrawn trilogy. The story deals with the return of the villainous Palpatine, having successfully cheated death by having his spiritual entity “reincarnated” through the essence transfer ritual and cloning technology. Other themes include Luke Skywalker temporarily succumbing to the dark side of the Force, the official return of Boba Fett (who had seemingly died after being swallowed by the Sarlacc in Return of the Jedi), and the first appearance of Princess Leia and Han Solo‘s son, Anakin Solo.

Hellboy: The Wild Hunt (2009)

Hellboy: The Wild Hunt limited series was originally released from December 2008 through November 2009 , also numbered (on the inside front cover) as issues 37 through 44 of the continuing Hellboy series. The storyline delves into Irish and Arthurian legend, reprising several characters first introduced in Hellboy short story “The Corpse”. As with Hellboy stories generally, it was published by Dark Horse Comics.

This will be, in part, the basis for the 2019 Hellboy reboot directed by Neil Marshall.

 

 

Danger Unlimited (1994)

Danger Unlimited was intended as an ongoing series, but it ended abruptly after just four issues at Byrne’s decision, due to less-than-anticipated sales brought on in part by the mid-1990s collapse of the American comic industry. Byrne himself provided insight into this collapse (or Wall Street-like “normalization”) in the letter column to issue #4. Byrne had intended the series to capture a wider, younger audience with a lower cover price and no content that would require a “mature” warning. Low pre-sales and long lead times gave him less revenue, so he made the decision that it was unprofitable to continue work on the title.