Manga Darkchylde (2005)

Darkchylde creator Randy Queen returns to write, draw, and re-imagine for an all- ages audience the character that made him famous!

In this first- ever, comic book release of Manga Darkchylde, the Sinister Sisters of Shadow have come to Salem, Georgia to seek an audience with a girl named Ariel Chylde! The same girl who just discovered she can become any of the creatures from her nightmares! Poor Ariel’s still just trying to adjust, and only wants to use her curse for good, but these creepy Sisters surely have something more sinister in mind!

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Terminator (1991)

This beautifully illustrated 48-page trade paperback spotlights writer James Robinson, who delivers a compelling and action-packed script which plays to Matt Wagner’s atmospheric and visually stunning renderings. Unknowingly, Kyle Reese went back in time to protect Sarah Conner from the second of two Terminators sent from the future to alter the past. In this one-shot special, we encounter the very first Terminator to be sent back through time, a female version of the 800-model, but just as deadly, if not more so. Her mission: to kill John Conner’s mother! The Sarah Conner that she finds has a mission of her own: to kill her new husband and take off with his vast wealth before ever having a baby!

Terminator (One Shot) NM $7

Give Me Liberty: An American Dream (1990)

Give Me Liberty is a four-issue mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics in 1990. It was created and written by Frank Miller and drawn by Dave Gibbons. The title of the series comes from a famous quotation by Patrick Henry: “I know not what course others may take but — as for me — give me liberty or give me death.”

Give Me Liberty was one of Frank Miller’s two creator-owned (the other was Hard Boiled) titles he took to Dark Horse after deciding to stop working for DC Comics after a dispute over a proposed ratings system.

The story is set in a dystopian near-future where the United States have split into several extremist factions, and tells the story of Martha Washington, a young American girl from a public housing project called “The Green” (see Chicago‘s Cabrini–Green). The series starts with Martha’s birth and sees her slowly grow up from someone struggling to break free of the public housing project, to being a war hero and major figure in deciding the fate of the United States.

The series was a mix of Miller’s typical action sequences as well as being a political satire of the United States and its major corporations. The series proved to be a huge success for Dark Horse and was one of the biggest selling independent comics of the time. A trade paperback was later released and Miller followed up Give Me Liberty with several sequels continuing the story. All of these sequels were drawn by Dave Gibbons and published by Dark Horse.

 

Ghost in the Shell- Dark Horse (1995)

In this cyberpunk iteration of a possible future, computer technology has advanced to the point that many members of the public possess cyberbrains, technology that allows them to interface their biological brain with various networks. The level of cyberization varies from simple minimal interfaces to almost complete replacement of the brain with cybernetic parts, in cases of severe trauma. This can also be combined with various levels of prostheses, with a fully prosthetic body enabling a person to become a cyborg. The heroine of Ghost in the Shell, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is such a cyborg, having had a terrible accident befall her as a child that ultimately required that she use a full-body prosthesis to house her cyberbrain. This high level of cyberization, however, opens the brain up to attacks from highly skilled hackers, with the most dangerous being those who will hack a person to bend to their whims.

 

Terminator: Secondary Objectives (1991)

The Terminator: Secondary Objectives is a four issue comic series set after the The Terminator. Secondary Objectives is the second part of four. The series was published in July 1991 by Dark Horse Comics.

After the first attack on Sarah Connor, she has fled out in the desert near Mexico City. Later in 1984, another terminator switches to its secondary mission, to track down and terminate the now pregnant Sarah Connor. Another terminator arrives to assume the primary mission of protecting the genesis of Skynet. But help is coming; Mary, Ed Astin and I825.M, a re-patriated terminator hybrid cyborg.

The series was written by James Robinson, pencilled by Paul Gulacy (who also did the cover art) and inked by Karl Kesel.

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction (1993)

Before Hellboy was published independently at Dark Horse Comics, the concept was initially pitched to a board of directors for DC Comics, who loved it, but did not like the idea of it involving “Hell”.

The early stories were conceived and drawn by Mignola with a script written by John Byrne and some later stories have been crafted by creators other than Mignola, including Christopher Golden, Guy Davis, Ryan Sook, and Duncan Fegredo. The increasing commitments from the Hellboy franchise meant that the 2008 one-shot In the Chapel of Moloch was the first Hellboy comic Mignola had provided the script and art for since The Island in 2005.

John Byrne’s 2112 (1991)

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as “Freaks” in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics, but the series never surfaced there. With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112, to become the John Byrne’s Next Men series. Two characters from the “Freaks” artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four-part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54-57 (later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne’s Next Men #0). The series ran until issue #30 and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a “sort of smell” of being a super-hero book. In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as “thought-bubbles” and sound-effects.

Byrne had intended to conclude the story in a second series after a six-month hiatus, but the collapse of the American comic-book industry in the mid-1990s made it financially unfeasible for him to do so, and he returned to working for hire at DC Comics and Marvel Comics.

John Byrne's 2112 NM $9
John Byrne’s 2112 NM $9

Star Wars – Dark Times: Out of the Wilderness (2011)

Dark Times is a 2006, 33 issue (32 + a ‘zero issue’) comic book mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics. It is part of their 30th anniversary retooling of its long-running Star Wars series of comics, replacing Star Wars: Republic.

The first issue was released on November 8, 2006, and is written by Mick Harrison from a plot by Welles Hartley.

The series is set in the Star Wars galaxy shortly after the events in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, and about 19 years before Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. The story begins in the days following the events in Purge by John Ostrander, and intertwines with the events of Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader by James Luceno.

Tank Girl V1 (1991)

Tank Girl is a British comic created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. The eponymouscharacter Tank Girl (Rebecca Buck) drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic’s style was heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips were frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plot or committed narrative.

The strip was initially set in a stylized post-apocalyptic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture.

Droids (1994)

In 1994, Dark Horse Comics published a new series of Star Wars: Droids, continuing the story started in Dark Horse Comics Nos. 17–19. Set before the events of Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, the mini-series ran for six issues. A Special No. 1 was released in January 1995, followed by a second mini-series that ran for eight issues. A one-shot titled Star Wars: Droids – The Protocol Offensive was published in September 1997.