DC Iron Age

Catwoman V1 (1990’s)

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In 1993, Catwoman was given her first ongoing comic book series. This series, written by an assortment of writers, but primarily penciled by Jim Balent, generally depicted the character as an international thief (and occasional bounty hunter) with an ambiguous moral code.

Story-lines include her adoption of teenage runaway, and erstwhile sidekick, Arizona; aiding Bane, whom she later betrays to Azrael; and a stint as a reluctant government operative. The series also fleshes out more of her origin, revealing her beginnings as a young thief, her difficult period in juvenile incarceration, and her training with Ted “Wildcat” Grant.

Moving to New York, Selina becomes corporate vice president then CEO of Randolf Industries, a mafia-influenced company, through blackmail. She plans to use this position to run for Mayor of New York City, but her hopes are dashed when the Trickster inadvertently connects her to her criminal alter ego.

Selina then returns to Gotham City, which at this time is in the midst of the No Man’s Land storyline. As Catwoman, she assists Batman againstLex Luthor in the reconstruction of the city. After being arrested by Commissioner Gordon, she escapes from prison. Later that year, during the “Officer Down” storyline in the Batman titles, Catwoman is initially the chief suspect. Although later cleared, she displays increasingly erratic behavior throughout the story. Soon afterward, she disappears and is believed to have been killed by the assassin Deathstroke the Terminator, ending her series at issue #94.

Supergirl Vol 5 (2005)

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After the launch of the Superman/Batman comic book series, Executive Editor Dan DiDio had been looking for a way to simplify the Supergirl character from her convoluted post-crisis history; the simplest version of course, was Superman’s cousin. Jeph Loeb and editor Eddie Berganza found an opening to reintroduce the character following the conclusion of the first story arc of Superman/Batman.

The modern version of Kara Zor-El made her debut in Superman/Batman #8 (2004). Kara takes the mantle of Supergirl at the conclusion of the storyline. The Supergirl comic book series would later be relaunched, now starring Kara Zor-El as “The Girl of Steel”. The first arc of the new series was written by Jeph Loeb and illustrated by Ian Churchill.

The Man of Steel (1986)

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The Man of Steel is a 1986 limited series featuring Superman. Written and drawn by John Byrne, the series was presented in six issues which were inked by Dick Giordano. The series told the story of Superman’s modern origin, which had been rebooted with the 1986 series Crisis on Infinite Earths.

DC editors wanted to make changes to the character of Superman, including making him the sole survivor of his home planet Krypton, and Byrne’s story was written to show these changes and to present Superman’s origin. The series includes the baby Kal-El rocketing away from the destruction of Krypton, Clark Kent as a teenager in Smallville learning that he was found in a crashed space ship, his being hired at the Daily Planet in Metropolis, the creation of his secret identity of Superman, his first meeting with fellow hero Batman, and how he finally learned of his birth parents and from where he came. The series also included the reintroduction of a number of supporting characters, including fellow reporter and love interest Lois Lane and archenemy Lex Luthor, who was re-branded from a mad scientist to a powerful businessman.

 

Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn (1989)

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Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn is a 1989-1990 limited series. The series retold the origins of Hal Jordan and how he became a Green Lantern in post-Crisis continuity. It was created by Keith Giffen and Gerard Jones, with the first issue written by Jim Owsley.

Doomsday: Year One (1995)

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Doomsday: Year One is a 1995 comic book one-shot annual, which tells stories about the character of Doomsday. Thus far, it is the only comic book released which is entirely about Doomsday. In this issue, Doomsday meets Darkseid for the first time and fights the Green Lantern Corps.

Doomsday – Year One #1 NM $8

Infinite Crisis (2005)

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“Infinite Crisis” is a 2005–2006 comic book storyline published by DC Comics, consisting of an eponymous, seven-issue comic book limited series written by Geoff Johns and illustrated by Phil Jimenez, George Pérez, Ivan Reis, and Jerry Ordway, and a number of tie-in books. The main miniseries debuted in October 2005, and each issue was released with two variant covers: one by Pérez, and one by Jim Lee and Sandra Hope.

The series storyline was a sequel to DC’s 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, which “rebooted” much of the DC continuity in an effort to fix 50 years of contradictory character history. It revisited characters and concepts from that earlier Crisis, including the existence of DC’s Multiverse. Some of the characters featured were alternate versions of comic icons such as an alternate Superman named Kal-L, who came from a parallel universe called Earth-Two. A major theme was the nature of heroism, contrasting the often dark and conflicted modern-day heroes with memories of “lighter” and ostensibly more noble and collegial heroes of American comic books’ earlier days.

Green Arrow – The Longbow Hunters (1987)

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Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters was nominated for a 1988 Eisner Award for Best Finite Series.

The series proved popular enough that DC Comics commissioned the first ever Green Arrow ongoing series, also written by Grell (writer from issues #1-80, 1988-1993). The series ran for 11 years. Grell would write a retelling of Green Arrow’s origin and first case in Secret Origins, (vol. 2) #38 (March 1989). Grell also wrote and illustrated the official Post-Crisis origin of Green Arrow in Green Arrow: The Wonder Year miniseries in 1993.

The series was major influence on TV series Arrow. Oliver is not referred to as “Green Arrow” in the show, wears a hooded costume similar to that worn in The Longbow Hunters, and in the first season, is willing to use lethal force. Edward Fyers is a main antagonist in the first season, and Shado has a recurring role in the first and second seasons. A character based on the Seattle Slasher, referred to as the Starling Slasher to match the show’s setting, appeared in the episode “Blind Spot.”

In 2014, writer Jeff Lemire used the name “Longbow Hunters” for a team of villains in his final story arc in the New 52 Green Arrow series.