Eightball (1989)

Eightball is an alternative comic book series written and drawn by Daniel Clowes. The first issue was published by Fantagraphics Books in 1989, soon after the end of Clowes’s previous comic series, Lloyd Llewellyn. It has consistently been among the best-selling independently authored comics.

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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles – Vol 1 (1980’s)

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was first published by Mirage Studios in 1984 in Dover, New Hampshire. The concept arose from a humorous drawing sketched out by Kevin Eastman during a casual evening of brainstorming and bad television with Peter Laird. Using money from a tax refund, together with a loan from Eastman’s uncle, the young artists self-published a single-issue comic intended to parody four of the most popular comics of the early 1980s: Marvel ComicsDaredevil and New Mutants, Dave Sim’s Cerebus, and Frank Miller’s Ronin. The TMNT comic series has been published in various incarnations by various comic book companies since 1984.

Locke & Key Grindhouse (2012)

Locke & Key is written by Joe Hill, illustrated by Gabriel Rodríguez and published by IDW Publishing. Set in the glare of a Depression-era summer, in which three Canuck gangsters carry out a heist and hide out at the Keyhouse. Locke & Key: Grindhouse includes an expanded ‘Guide to Keyhouse,’ which describes the mansion.

Locke & Key Grindhouse #1 NM- $12

Hack/Slash (2004)

Hack/Slash is a series, launched from several one shots of the same name, published by Image Comics (previously by Devil’s Due Publishing). The series was created by writer and sometime penciller Tim Seeley. The series follows horror victim Cassie Hack as she strikes back at the monsters who prey upon teenagers. These monsters are known as “slashers”, and are a mix of original villains and crossover appearances, such as the appearance of Re-Animator (from Herbert West–Reanimator) in Volume 1.

Hack Slash #1 NM $79
Hack Slash #1 NM $79

Strangers in Paradise V2 (1995)

SiP, as it is commonly known, began as a three-issue mini-series published by Antarctic Press in 1993, which focused entirely on the relationship between the three main characters and Francine’s unfaithful boyfriend. This is now known as “Volume 1”. Thirteen issues were published under Moore’s own “Abstract Studio” imprint, and these make up “Volume 2”. This is where the “thriller” plot was introduced. The series moved to Image Comics‘ Homage imprint for the start of “Volume 3”, but after eight issues moved back to Abstract Studio, where it continued with the same numbering. Volume 3 concluded at issue #90, released June 6, 2007.

Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom (2010)

The Locke children have grown accustomed to the myriad magical keys discovered within the ancenstral family home of Keyhouse. The have also grown accustomed to tragedy. What they may not be prepared for is just how closely danger stalks their every move as Lucas Caravaggio, alias Kack Wells, continues his relentless quest for the key to the black door. New keys and old specters join the story as innocence is lost and determination is forged.

Cyberfrog V1 Harris (1996)

In an attempt to spead peace and knowledge throughout the universe, a plan was formed to send out unseeded energy masses to distant planets inside high technology living sentient robots, known as the Sinn. The Sinn was to be the ‘first parent’. On Earth, a human was to be the ‘second parent’.Aboard the vessel named Kjell Sinn was the energy mass named Trikk Rhan, the son of Sicha Rhan and his mate Kjell Rhan.

A crash landing on Earth in a swamp caused the energy mass to release early. As it leaked out, the Sinn was the first contact as planned. But the energy mass of Trikk Rhan came into contact with a bullfrog. The result was a surly hero who enjoys fried chicken, caffeine and violence.

Cyberfrog #2 Harris NM $29

Stray Bullets (1995)

Stray Bullets is an independent American comic book series published in black and white (with color covers) by El Capitan Books. It is written and drawn by David Lapham.

The story deals with the often criminal and sometimes tragic misadventures of a large cast of characters and takes place from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s.

In March 2014, Image Comics ended the hiatus of Stray Bullets with the publication of the final issue of the HiJinks and Derring-Do arc, and the simultaneous launch of a new arc entitled Killers. A giant-sized softcover trade paperback edition (The Uber Alles Edition) collecting all forty-one issues of the original series was also released by Image Comics. Killers ran for 8 issues throughout 2014, then after a brief hiatus, Lapham returned in early 2015 with Stray Bullets: Sunshines & Roses. Lapham plans to continue publishing Stray Bullets in this fashion at Image, with each arc treated as a discrete miniseries.

The series has been nominated for numerous awards. Stray Bullets won the 1996 Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist, Drama, and the trade paperback collection Stray Bullets: Innocence of Nihilism won the 1997 Eisner Award for “Best Graphic Album-Reprint” the Comic Book Awards Almanac and was a top votegetter for the Comics Buyer’s Guide Fan Award for Favorite Reprint Graphic Novel/Album for the same year.

Radioactive Man V1 (1994)

Radioactive Man was one of the four “premiere” series released by Bongo Comics in late 1993. The series has been released in two volumes, an early run from 1993–1994, and the current run that’s been going on since 2000. Smaller Radioactive Man stories have also been published in Simpsons Comics. As a tie-in promotion of The Simpsons Movie a special “Radioactive Man Comic Book Edition #711” was sold at 7-Elevens as part of their Kwik-E-Mart promotion.

Lone Wolf and Cub – First

When Lone Wolf and Cub was first released in Japan in 1970, it became wildly popular (some 8 million copies were sold in Japan) for its powerful, epic samurai story and its stark and gruesome depiction of violence during Tokugawa era Japan.

Lone Wolf and Cub is one of most highly regarded manga due to its epic scope, detailed historical accuracy, masterful artwork and nostalgic recollection of the bushido ethos. The story spans 28 volumes of manga, with over 300 pages each (totaling over 8,700 pages in all). Many of the frames of the series are hauntingly beautiful depictions of nature, historical locations in Japan and traditional activities done in the classical ukiyo-e style.

Lone Wolf and Cub was initially released in North America in a translated English edition by First Comics in 1987, as a series of monthly, comic-book-sized, square-bound prestige-format black-and-white comics containing between 64 and 128 pages, with covers by Frank Miller, and later by Bill Sienkiewicz, Matt Wagner, Mike Ploog, and Ray Lago. Sales were initially strong, but fell sharply as the company went into a general decline. First Comics shut down in 1991 without completing the series, publishing less than a third of the total series in 45 prestige-format issues.

Starting in September 2000, Dark Horse Comics began to release the full series in 28 smaller-sized trade paperback volumes, similar to the volumes published in Japan, completing the series with the 28th volume in December 2002. Dark Horse reused all of Miller’s covers from the First Comics edition, as well as several done by Sienkiewicz, and commissioned Wagner, Guy Davis, and Vince Locke to produce new covers for several volumes of the collections. In October 2012, Dark Horse completed the release of all 28 volumes in digital format, as part of their “Dark Horse Digital” online service.