Masters of the Universe V3 (2004)

The comic book studio MVCreations produced numerous Masters of the Universe comics during the promotion of the 2002-2004 toy line.  MVCreations is a studio headed by Val Staples, originallly publishing through Image Comics. Following their success with the Masters of the Universe license, the two companies parted ways. MVCreations soon partnered with CrossGen Comics. Despite obtaining the license of two Don Bluth properties, as well as publishing a horror comic by Rob Zombie, the studio failed to off-set financial problems, in part due to CrossGen’s own financial downturn. The studio parted ways with CrossGen and became a full publisher on their own. As Hasbro’s enthusiasm in the Masters of the Universe property faded, MVCreations returned to publishd under Image Comics.

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Poison Elves (1990’s)

I, Lusiphur (December 1991-December 1992) – Poison Elves (February 1993-February 1995) Hayes originally self-published the series during the early 90s under his company Mulehide Graphics under the title of I, Lusiphur. The title was changed to Poison Elves because the similarity of Lusiphur to Lucifer led to the misconception that the series was Satanic in nature. Sales were reported to have increased significantly after the name change. Drew claimed in one of his Starting Notes that the name change was prompted by a letter from a teen-aged fan whose mother had thrown out his comics after finding I, Lusiphur comics amongst his collection.

The first ten issues of the Mulehide series were published in a larger magazine size format. In 1995, Drew Hayes signed on with Sirius Entertainment, a move that increased his exposure, fan base, and publishing rate. To date, ten trade paperbacks have been released, but the last issue of the main series published by Sirius was #79. Hayes died in 2007, thus bringing the series to an abrupt end. A commemorative issue #80 was released to give fans a look at sketches and plans Drew Hayes had for the future of the series before his death.

Rick and Morty (2015)

On April 1, 2015, a Rick and Morty comic book adaptation debuted with its first monthly issue, entitled “BAM!” The series is written by Zac Gorman and illustrated by CJ Cannon.[71] Artist Tom Fowler wrote a multi-issue story arc that began in March 2016. Using the television series’ established premise of alternate timelines, the comic book expressly features the Rick and Morty (and supporting cast) of a different timeline, allowing the comics to tell stories without conflicting with the canon of the show.

Hack/Slash (2004)

Hack/Slash is a series, launched from several one shots of the same name, published by Image Comics (previously by Devil’s Due Publishing). The series was created by writer and sometime penciller Tim Seeley. The series follows horror victim Cassie Hack as she strikes back at the monsters who prey upon teenagers. These monsters are known as “slashers”, and are a mix of original villains and crossover appearances, such as the appearance of Re-Animator (from Herbert West–Reanimator) in Volume 1.

Hack Slash #1 NM $74

Dead Air (1990)

Mike Allred started drawing comics in 1989 with the 104-page graphic novel Dead Air (Slave Labor Graphics). The story loosely followed his stint in radio as a sidebar to the true focus of the novel, the effects of post-nuclear war over a small Oregon town.

Flaming Carrot Comics (1980’s)

The Flaming Carrot origin states that “having read 5,000 comics in a single sitting to win a bet, this poor man suffered brain damage and appeared directly thereafter as—the Flaming Carrot!”

The Carrot, who lives in Palookaville, a neighborhood of Iron City, has staved off at least three alien invasions, a Communist take over of Iron City, flying dead dogs, the Man in the Moon, Death itself, and a cloned horde of evil marching Hitler‘s boots. Possessing no real super powers, the Carrot wins the day through sheer grit, raw determination, blinding stupidity, and bizarre luck. Flaming Carrot even died in #6 (fell into a deep toxic waste pit in Palookaville), was brought back from clinical death in #7, described his sojourn in Limbo in #8 and got back at those who sent him to Limbo in #9.

Flaming Carrot was also a founding member of the blue collar superhero group the Mystery Men, introduced in a flashback/dream sequence in Flaming Carrot Comics #16. The story of this group was later made into the 1999 movie Mystery Men and a short-lived spin-off comic book series. The Flaming Carrot himself does not appear in the film, although a handful of characters like Mr. Furious, the Shoveler, and Dr. Heller do.

Grafik Muzik (1990)

Madman first appeared as Frank Einstien in Creatures of the Id and Grafik Muzik published in 1990, but it wasn’t until March 1992 that the first Madman miniseries debuted from Tundra Publishing. The series gained further recognition with its move to Dark Horse Comics in April 1994, where it was relaunched as Madman Comics and went on to be nominated for several Harvey AwardsMadman Comics ran for 20 issues and ended in 2000. From 2007–2009, Image Comics published Madman: Atomic Comics for 17 issues.

Grafik Muzik #1 NM $39

Eightball (1989)

Eightball is an alternative comic book series written and drawn by Daniel Clowes. The first issue was published by Fantagraphics Books in 1989, soon after the end of Clowes’s previous comic series, Lloyd Llewellyn. It has consistently been among the best-selling independently authored comics.

Bartman(1993)

Bartman was a short-lived series that told the tale of Bart Simpson’s superhero alter-ego, Bartman. It was one of the four ‘premiere’ series released by Bongo Comics in late 1993. The Bartman series lasted only six issues, and was canceled in 1995. Many smaller Bartman stories have since been published in Simpsons Comics and Bart Simpson comics.

The main writers and artists for the first three issues were Steve Vance and Bill Morrison, who were behind the creation of Bongo Comics itself. In late 1994, Steve Vance and his wife Cindy left Bongo Comics. The Bartman comic was put on hold and there was a gap of 9 months between Bartman #3 and #4. #4-6 contained a three-issue story arc written by Gary Glasberg and Bill Morrison, and with issue 6, Bartman was discontinued.

Bartman #4 NM $6

Simpsons Comics (1990’s)

Simpsons Comics is a monthly series based on the animated TV show The Simpsons. The first issue was published on November 29, 1993. Since then over two hundred issues have been released, with the 100th issue mainly the comic book equivalent of a clip show. It was originally published bi-monthly, but went monthly in the fall of 2000.

Since March 1997, the comic has also had a monthly United Kingdom edition. This mainly reprints the stories from the U.S. edition, along with pages featuring UK readers’ drawings (currently Springfield Multiplex for movie parodies and Android’s Dungeon for video game and comic book parodies) and Junk Mail, a letters page which also features generic drawings, along with the readers’ frequent attempts to guess the identity of ‘Junk Mail Guy’, the incredibly sarcastic man who answers the letters and has apparently been locked up in a basement. The U.S. and Australian editions used to have Junk Mail, but it disappeared beginning with #114. But returned some time later.