Independent Iron Age

Neil Gaiman – Guest of Honor – Chicago Comicon 1993

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A comic/ashcan of Neil Gaiman by Scott McCloud, Mike Dringberg, Todd McFarlane, Karen Berger, Dave Sim, Coleen Doran, Rick Veitch, Michael Zulli, Jill Thompson, Eddie Campbell, Steve Bissette, Mark Buckingham, Cat Yronwode, and Larry Marder. The red variant was limited to 2500 signed and numbered copies.

X-Files – Topps

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X-Files  was originally published by Topps Comics and ran for 41 issues from January 1995 to September 1998, coinciding with the second through fifth seasons of the television program.

In 1996, Topps published X-Files #0, an adaptation of the pilot episode, in order to test the market for a series adapting the episodes of the X-Files TV series. The issue was successful, and X-Files Season One ran for nine issues (August 1997 – July 1998). The series’s name was provisional, and Topps in fact intended to adapt every episode, but never got as far as season two. The series was written by Roy Thomas, who would create a first draft for each issue by working off of the episode’s script, then watch the actual episode and modify his work to account for changes made on the set.

Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom (2010)

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The Locke children have grown accustomed to the myriad magical keys discovered within the ancenstral family home of Keyhouse. The have also grown accustomed to tragedy. What they may not be prepared for is just how closely danger stalks their every move as Lucas Caravaggio, alias Kack Wells, continues his relentless quest for the key to the black door. New keys and old specters join the story as innocence is lost and determination is forged.

Stray Bullets (1995)

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Stray Bullets is an independent American comic book series published in black and white (with color covers) by El Capitan Books. It is written and drawn by David Lapham.

The story deals with the often criminal and sometimes tragic misadventures of a large cast of characters and takes place from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s.

In March 2014, Image Comics ended the hiatus of Stray Bullets with the publication of the final issue of the HiJinks and Derring-Do arc, and the simultaneous launch of a new arc entitled Killers. A giant-sized softcover trade paperback edition (The Uber Alles Edition) collecting all forty-one issues of the original series was also released by Image Comics. Killers ran for 8 issues throughout 2014, then after a brief hiatus, Lapham returned in early 2015 with Stray Bullets: Sunshines & Roses. Lapham plans to continue publishing Stray Bullets in this fashion at Image, with each arc treated as a discrete miniseries.

The series has been nominated for numerous awards. Stray Bullets won the 1996 Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist, Drama, and the trade paperback collection Stray Bullets: Innocence of Nihilism won the 1997 Eisner Award for “Best Graphic Album-Reprint” the Comic Book Awards Almanac and was a top votegetter for the Comics Buyer’s Guide Fan Award for Favorite Reprint Graphic Novel/Album for the same year.

Bartman(1993)

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Bartman was a short-lived series that told the tale of Bart Simpson’s superhero alter-ego, Bartman. It was one of the four ‘premiere’ series released by Bongo Comics in late 1993. The Bartman series lasted only six issues, and was canceled in 1995. Many smaller Bartman stories have since been published in Simpsons Comics and Bart Simpson comics.

The main writers and artists for the first three issues were Steve Vance and Bill Morrison, who were behind the creation of Bongo Comics itself. In late 1994, Steve Vance and his wife Cindy left Bongo Comics. The Bartman comic was put on hold and there was a gap of 9 months between Bartman #3 and #4. #4-6 contained a three-issue story arc written by Gary Glasberg and Bill Morrison, and with issue 6, Bartman was discontinued.

Bartman #4 NM $6

The Crow – Tundra (1992)

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The Crow was created by James O’Barr. The series was originally written by O’Barr as a means of dealing with the death of his girlfriend at the hands of a drunk driver. It was later published by Caliber Comics in 1989, becoming an underground success, and later adapted into a film of the same name in 1994. Three film sequels, a television series and numerous books and comic books have also been subsequently produced.

The story revolves around an unfortunate young man named Eric. He and his fiancée, Shelly, are assaulted by a gang of street thugs after their car breaks down. Eric is shot in the head and is paralyzed, and can only watch as Shelly is savagely beaten and raped. They are then left for dead on the side of the road.

He is resurrected by a crow and seeks vengeance on the murderers, methodically stalking and killing them. When not on the hunt, Eric stays in the house he shared with Shelly, spending most of his time there lost in memories of her. Her absence is torture for him; he is in emotional pain, even engaging in self-mutilation by cutting himself.

The crow acts as both guide and goad for Eric, giving him information that helps him in his quest but also chastising him for dwelling on Shelly’s death, seeing his pining as useless self-indulgence that distracts him from his purpose.

Poison Elves (1990’s)

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I, Lusiphur (December 1991-December 1992) – Poison Elves (February 1993-February 1995) Hayes originally self-published the series during the early 90s under his company Mulehide Graphics under the title of I, Lusiphur. The title was changed to Poison Elves because the similarity of Lusiphur to Lucifer led to the misconception that the series was Satanic in nature. Sales were reported to have increased significantly after the name change. Drew claimed in one of his Starting Notes that the name change was prompted by a letter from a teen-aged fan whose mother had thrown out his comics after finding I, Lusiphur comics amongst his collection.

The first ten issues of the Mulehide series were published in a larger magazine size format. In 1995, Drew Hayes signed on with Sirius Entertainment, a move that increased his exposure, fan base, and publishing rate. To date, ten trade paperbacks have been released, but the last issue of the main series published by Sirius was #79. Hayes died in 2007, thus bringing the series to an abrupt end. A commemorative issue #80 was released to give fans a look at sketches and plans Drew Hayes had for the future of the series before his death.