Masters of the Universe V3 (2004)

The comic book studio MVCreations produced numerous Masters of the Universe comics during the promotion of the 2002-2004 toy line.  MVCreations is a studio headed by Val Staples, originallly publishing through Image Comics. Following their success with the Masters of the Universe license, the two companies parted ways. MVCreations soon partnered with CrossGen Comics. Despite obtaining the license of two Don Bluth properties, as well as publishing a horror comic by Rob Zombie, the studio failed to off-set financial problems, in part due to CrossGen’s own financial downturn. The studio parted ways with CrossGen and became a full publisher on their own. As Hasbro’s enthusiasm in the Masters of the Universe property faded, MVCreations returned to publishd under Image Comics.

 

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Invader Zim #1 (2015)

On February 20, 2015, Oni Press announced that they would be releasing an official Comic Book series based on Invader Zim, in collaboration with Jhonen Vasquez and Nickelodeon. Jhonen Vasquez said: “I’m always confused when people say how much they miss Invader Zim because the show never stopped running in my head, and then I remember everyone else isn’t in my head”. A pre-issue 0 was released on May 23, 2015 as a zine and foreshadow to the comic book series. The first issue was released on July 8, 2015, and since then most issues are released on a monthly basis.

Verotika (1994)

Verotika is an erotic horror anthology for mature audiences that attracted some of the best talent in the industry. Grant Morrison, Simon Bisley, and Frank Frazetta all worked on this anthology that offered creators the opportunity to unleash some of the most depraved, filthy, perverted and downright immoral stories ever told in comics. After every issue readers were left with the feeling that they needed to bathe in holy water.

 

Harbinger V1 (1992)

Harbinger is a series published by Valiant Comics about a group of teenage super-powered outcasts known as Harbingers.

Harbinger initially featured writing and art by Jim Shooter and David Lapham. After Acclaim Entertainment purchased the rights to the Valiant catalog for $65 million in 1994, the characters were rebooted in Harbinger: Acts of God to make them more easily adaptable to video games. They continued to appear in many Valiant titles, most prominently the Unity 2000 series. Harbinger was one of the best selling Valiant titles with total sales in all languages of over five million comics.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1990)

In honor of the film’s fifteenth anniversary, Caliber released a three-part comic adaptation in 1990. In addition to telling the story of normal couple Brad and Janet who fall into the clutches of the mad (and transvestite) Dr. Frank-n-Furter, it also included movie song lyrics, interviews with the stars, and “chorus” lines that let Rocky “virgins” know what the routine is when they go see the movie.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show #1 NM- $5

Deadworld (1987)

Hard to believe this series started almost 30 years ago. Deadworld follows survivors in a post-apocalyptic scenario brought on by zombie attacks. Led by King Zombie, Deadworld brings forth a different slant than just humans slaughtering zombies.

Originally published by Arrow Comics, Deadworld was written and created by Stuart Kerr and Ralph Griffith in 1987, scripted by Kerr for the first seven issues and illustrated by Vince Locke. The comic book quickly became a cult favorite success in the independent publisher industry.

Arrow Comics ceased production of all titles, but sold the rights of the title to Locke who transferred the rights to Gary Reed‘s Caliber Comics. By the twelfth issue of the title, Reed took over as the primary writer. The first volume of Deadworld ended in 1992 after twenty-six issues. One year later, a second volume began. The second volume ended after fifteen issues.

The Boys (2006)

The series is set between 2006–2008 in a world where superheroes exist. However, most of the superheroes in the series’ universe are corrupted by their celebrity status and often engage in reckless behavior, compromising the safety of the world. For this reason, a superpowered CIA squad, known informally as “The Boys”, is charged with monitoring the superhero community; the name is Butcher’s contribution, a reference from his neighborhood that those in power would send “the boys” to handle anyone causing trouble.

Ennis has said that the series would “out-Preacher Preacher“, presumably referring to the extreme violence and sexuality that were that series’ hallmark, and that the series would end with its seventy-second issue.

 

Vengeance of Vampirella (1990’s)

Upon Warren’s bankruptcy shortly afterward, Harris Publications acquired the company assets at auction in August 1983, although legal murkiness and a 1999 lawsuit by Warren publisher James Warren resulted in his re-acquisition of the rights to sister publications Creepy and Eerie. Harris Comics published Vampirella stories in various series and miniseries from 1991 to 2007. Harris also published Vampirella #113, a one-issue continuation of the original series, containing solely reprinted stories, in 1988.

Simpsons Comics (1990’s)

Simpsons Comics is a monthly series based on the animated TV show The Simpsons. The first issue was published on November 29, 1993. Since then over two hundred issues have been released, with the 100th issue mainly the comic book equivalent of a clip show. It was originally published bi-monthly, but went monthly in the fall of 2000.

Since March 1997, the comic has also had a monthly United Kingdom edition. This mainly reprints the stories from the U.S. edition, along with pages featuring UK readers’ drawings (currently Springfield Multiplex for movie parodies and Android’s Dungeon for video game and comic book parodies) and Junk Mail, a letters page which also features generic drawings, along with the readers’ frequent attempts to guess the identity of ‘Junk Mail Guy’, the incredibly sarcastic man who answers the letters and has apparently been locked up in a basement. The U.S. and Australian editions used to have Junk Mail, but it disappeared beginning with #114. But returned some time later.

 

Optic Nerve (1995)

Optic Nerve is a series by cartoonist Adrian Tomine. Originally self-published by Tomine in 1991 as a series of mini-comics (which have later been collected in a single volume,32 Stories), the series has been published by Drawn and Quarterly since 1995.

Tomine’s style and subject matter are restrained and realistic. Many are set in Northern California. Many of his stories for Optic Nerve feature Asian American characters, including “Hawaiian Getaway,” “Six-Day Cold,” “Layover,” and “Shortcomings.” Adrian Tomine is Asian American and lives in Brooklyn, New York. Many topics of his stories are at least partly autobiographical.

In the initial self-published issues, as well as the first eight Drawn & Quarterly issues (1995-2001), Optic Nerve was typically a collection of short stories. After an extended hiatus, Tomine resumed the comic in fall of 2004 and began his first multi-issue storyline, “Shortcomings,” with #9. The most recent issue, #13, was published in July 2013.