Spider-Man V1 (1990’s)

Spider-Man ran for 98 issues from 1990 to 1998. The series was re titled Peter Parker: Spider-Man with issue #75, but only on the covers, the series was still under its original Spider-Man title in the comic’s legal indicia, printed on the title page, from #75 to #98; the comic book would not officially be titled Peter Parker: Spider-Man until the volume 2 series relaunch.

The series originally was conceived as a showcase for Todd McFarlane. McFarlane, who until then had only been known as an artist, was hugely popular at the time and the series was created by editor Jim Salicrup so that McFarlane could pencil, ink, and write a Spider-Man title of his own, starting with the “Torment” storyline.

The series was a massive sales success with over 2.5 million copies printed. McFarlane stayed on the title until issue #16 (November 1991) in which the story was printed in a landscape format. He would go on to create the character Spawn and help found Image Comics in 1992. He was succeeded on the title by Erik Larsen, who had succeeded McFarlane on The Amazing Spider-Man two years earlier, and would later join him in the founding of Image. Larsen wrote and drew the six-issue story arc “Revenge of the Sinister Six” (#18–23). Writer Don McGregor and artist Marshall Rogers crafted a two-part story in issues #27–28 dealing with gun violence.

After that came a quick procession of different contributors, including writers Tom DeFalco, Ann Nocenti, David Michelinie, J. M. DeMatteis and Terry Kavanagh, and pencillers Ron Frenz, Klaus Janson and Jae Lee. The creative-team musical chairs settled with Spider-Man #44 (March 1994) when writer Howard Mackie and penciller Tom Lyle began a run on the title – Lyle through #61, and Mackie for over 6 years, through cancellation and into Vol. 2.

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Thanos (2004)

In 2004 Thanos received an eponymous title that ran for 12 issues. After defeating the Hunger, Thanos went to the frontline and gave himself up to the Omega Corps. After a panicked action from the corps they send him to the Kyln. On his way he killed a Skrull agent to give them a reason to imprisoned him. On Kyln, a priest told him about the prison while Thanos is watching the Crunch. When the Priest left, Death appeared and talked to him, telling him She loves him in her way, and that he hadn’t given her anything that she didn’t already have.

 

Secret Avengers V1 (2012)

Secret Avengers, published by Marvel Comics features a fictional black ops superhero team of the same name. The series started with Ed Brubaker on writing duties, depicting a black-ops sect of Marvel’s premiere super hero team, the Avengers, which operates under the guidance and leadership of Captain Steve Rogers (the former Captain America). The series is part of the Avengers-line relaunch as part of the “Heroic Age“.

Secret Avengers V1 #23 2nd print NM $39
Secret Avengers V1 #23 2nd print NM $39

Amazing Spider-Man V1 (1980’s)

During his two years on the title, Roger Stern augmented the backgrounds of long-established Spider-Man villains, and with Romita Jr. created the mysterious supervillain the Hobgoblin in #238-239 (March–April 1983) Fans engaged with the mystery of the Hobgoblin’s secret identity, which continued throughout #244-245 and 249-251 (Sept.-Oct. 1983 and Feb.-April 1984). One lasting change was the reintroduction of Mary Jane Watson as a more serious, mature woman who becomes Peter’s confidante after she reveals that she knows his secret identity. Stern wrote “The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man” in The Amazing Spider-Man #248 (January 1984), a story which ranks among his most popular.

David Michelinie took over as writer in #290 (July 1987) that led to the marriage of Peter Parker and Mary Jane Watson in Amazing Spider-Man Annual #21. The “Kraven’s Last Hunt” storyline by writer J.M. DeMatteis and artists Mike Zeck and Bob McLeod crossed over into The Amazing Spider-Man #293 and 294. Issue #298 (March 1988) was the first Spider-Man comic to be drawn by future industry star Todd McFarlane, the first regular artist on The Amazing Spider-Man since Frenz’s departure. McFarlane revolutionized Spider-Man’s look. His depiction – large-eyed, with wiry, contorted limbs, and messy, knotted, convoluted webbing – influenced the way virtually all subsequent artists would draw the character. McFarlane’s other significant contribution to the Spider-Man canon was the design for what would become one of Spider-Man’s most wildly popular antagonists, the supervillain Venom. Issue #299 (April 1988) featured Venom’s first appearance (a last-page cameo) before his first full appearance in #300 (May 1988). The latter issue featured Spider-Man reverting to his original red-and-blue costume.

Other notable issues of the Michelinie-McFarlane era include #312 (Feb. 1989), featuring the Green Goblin vs. the Hobgoblin; and #315-317 (May–July 1989), with the return of Venom. In July 2012, Todd McFarlane’s original cover art for The Amazing Spider-Man #328 sold for a bid of $657,250, making it the most expensive American comic book art ever sold at auction.

 

Spider-Man 2099 (1992)

Spider-Man 2099 was created by Peter David and Rick Leonardi in 1992 for Marvel ComicsMarvel 2099 line. His secret alter ego is Miguel O’Hara, a brilliant geneticist living in New York in the year 2099 A.D. who is attempting to recreate the abilities of the original Spider-Man in other people and later suffers a related accident that causes half his DNA to be re-written with a spider’s genetic code. O’Hara is the first Latino character to assume the identity of Spider-Man.

Runaways V1 (2003)

Runaways features a group of teenagers who discover that their parents are part of an evil crime organization known as “The Pride“. Created by Brian K. Vaughan and Adrian Alphona, the series debuted in July of 2003 as part of Marvel Comics’ “Tsunami” imprint. The series had been canceled in September 2004 at issue eighteen, but due to high numbers of trade collection sales, Marvel revived the series in February 2005.

Originally, the series featured a group of six kids whose parents routinely met every year for a charity event. One year, the kids spy on their parents and learn they are “the Pride”, a criminal group of mob bosses, time-travelers, dark wizards, mad scientists, alien invaders and telepathic mutants. The kids steal weapons and resources from their parents, and learn they themselves inherited their parents’ powers; Alex Wilder, a prodigy, leads the team while Nico Minoru learns she is a powerful witch, Karolina Dean discovers she is an alien, Gertrude Yorkes learns of her telepathic link to a dinosaur, Chase Steinsteals his father’s futuristic gloves, while young Molly Hayes learns she is a mutant with incredible strength. The kids band together and defeat their parents, and atone for the sins of their parents by fighting the new threats trying to fill in the Pride’s void. After being betrayed by Alex who was killed by the Gibborim (The Pride’s God) they are later joined by cyborg Victor Mancha, shape-shifting SkrullXavin, and plant-manipulator Klara Prast.

Captain America V7 (2012)

Captain America vol. 7 was launched in November 2012 with a January 2013 cover date by writer Rick Remender and artist John Romita Jr..

On July 16, 2014 Marvel Comics announced that the mantle of Captain America would be passed on by Rogers (who in the most recent storyline has been turned into a 90-year-old man) to his long-time ally The Falcon, with the series being relaunched as All-New Captain America.

Captain America #15 Francesco Mattina 1:50 Variant. NM $29

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born (2007)

The Gunslinger Born is an expansion and interpretation of events covered in The Dark Tower series, beginning with Roland Deschain‘s manhood test against Cort and ending with the last events of the flashback sequences in Wizard and Glass. Later arcs will “cover the time period between Roland leaving Hambry and the fall of Gilead“. The Gunslinger Born is followed by The Long Road Home, whose first issue was released on March 5, 2008.

Stray Toasters (1988)

Stray Toasters is a four-issue comic book mini-series created, written and illustrated by Bill Sienkiewicz and published by Marvel Comics‘s imprint Epic Comics in 1988. Although it was critically acclaimed, it never reached widespread circulation like Sienkiewicz’s later works.

The story revolves around criminal psychologist Egon Rustemagik and his investigation of a serial killer who seems to be targeting women.

 

Fantastic Four (1990’s)

Writer-artist Walt Simonson took over as writer of Fantastic Four with #334 (December 1989), and three issues later began pencilling and inking as well. With brief inking exceptions, two fill-in issues, and a three-issue stint drawn by Arthur Adams, Simonson remained in all three positions through #354 (July 1991).

Simonson, who had been writing the team comic The Avengers, had gotten approval for Reed and Sue to join that team after Engelhart had written them out of Fantastic Four. Yet by The Avengers #300, where they were scheduled to join the team, Simonson was told the characters were returning to Fantastic Four. This led to Simonson quitting The Avengers after that issue. Shortly afterward, he was offered the job of writing Fantastic Four. Having already prepared a number of stories involving the Avengers with Reed and Sue in the lineup, he then rewrote these for Fantastic Four. Simonson later recalled that working on Fantastic Four allowed him the latitude to use original Avengers members Thor and Iron Man, which he had been precluded from using in The Avengers.

After another fill-in, the regular team of writer and Marvel editor-in-chief Tom DeFalco, penciller Paul Ryan and inker Dan Bulanadi took over, with Ryan self-inking beginning with #360 (Jan. 1992). That team, with the very occasional different inker, continued for years through #414 (July 1996). DeFalco nullified the Storm-Masters marriage by retconning that the alien Skrull Empire had kidnapped the real Masters and replaced her with a spy named Lyja. Once discovered, Lyja, who herself had fallen for Storm, helped the Fantastic Four rescue Masters. Ventura departed after being further mutated by Doctor Doom. Although some fans were not pleased with DeFalco’s run on Fantastic Four, calling him “The Great Satan”, the title’s sales increased over the period.