Silk V2 (2015)

As part of the All-New, All-Different Marvel branding, Silk is on a stakeout at a skating rink. Silk’s Spider-Sense goes off as a group of Goblin Nation grunts rob a bank. Monologuing to herself, Silk reveals she’d been tailing the Goblin Nation for two weeks in order to avenge her brother who was infused with Goblin Formula and now has no memory of what happened to their parents. Extending claws, Silk slashes the Goblin Nation grunts’ getaway car and webs them up, taking their loot, a safety deposit box containing Parker Industries tech. Thinking to herself that she has no idea what’s in the safety deposit box just that her boss wants it, Silk returns to her now-employer Black Cat, who she is working with despite their earlier antagonism, who scolds her for showing mercy and tells her that being good is bad for business.

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Spider-Man Unlimited V1 (1993)

Originally announced under the title Spider-Man Giant Size, the 1993 series was a quarterly series with double-length stories, which at the time was notable for being printed on glossy stock paper (a practice discontinued in later issues before being adopted by the entire Marvel line in the 2000s). Earlier issues played a part in Spider-Man crossovers; the first issue was the first part of Maximum Carnage and the second issue was the last part of Maximum Carnage. Issues #7-14 formed part of the Clone Saga. Later in the series, the focus shifted to stand-alone stories. Ron Lim penciled the lead story in the first 8 issues of the book. Most of the later issues were written by Christopher Golden and drawn by Joe Bennett.

 

The Ultimates V2 (2004)

In a 2004 interview, Millar outlined the difference between the Ultimates and the Avengers: “The idea behind The Avengers is that the Marvel Universe’s biggest players all get together and fight all the biggest supervillains they can’t defeat individually, whereas Ultimates 2 is an exploration of what happens when a bunch of ordinary people are turned into super-soldiers and being groomed to fight the real-life war on terror.”

Death’s Head V1 (1988)

Death’s Head is a fictional character appearing in British comics and American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is depicted as a robotic bounty hunter (or rather, as he calls himself, a “freelance peace-keeping agent”). The character was created by writer Simon Furman and artist Geoff Senior for the company’s Marvel UK imprint. Furman decided to use Death’s Head in his Transformers stories, but believed that characters appearing in Transformers “were prone to be absorbed into that title’s catchall copyright” (allowing Hasbro to contest their ownership) and led to a one-page strip titled “High Noon Tex” (which was subsequently published in various Marvel UK titles) being hastily created to establish Marvel’s ownership of the character. Furman has stated that he chose the name Death’s Head for the character while unaware of the “Nazi-connotations of the name”.

Vision (2016)

In 2016 Vision was given a solo series. He lives in Fairfax, Virginia with a synthazoid family: his wife Virginia, son Vin, and daughter Viv. They attempt to live a normal suburban life with Vision working as a consultant to the president, but they find a difficult time socializing with neighbors. Eventually Grim Reaper attacks their house and nearly kills Viv. Virginia claims that the Reaper escaped, but The Vision eventually finds his remains buried in the back yard. He lies to the police and covers for her when asked about her whereabouts during the murder of neighbors, who tried to blackmail Virginia for the murder, but was accidentally killed by her. Instead of confronting her, he creates a sythezoid dog for the family, in an attempt to return to normalcy, but unbeknownst to him Agatha Harkness has a vision of the future and tries to warn the Avengers that The Vision and his family will cause a genocide.

Blade: The Vampire-Hunter (1994)

Following the cancellation of Nightstalkers, Blade debuted in his first color-comics series, Blade: The Vampire Hunter #1–10 (July 1994 – April 1995), written by Ian Edginton (with the last two issues by Terry Kavanagh) and penciled by Doug Wheatley.

Silver Surfer V8 (2016)

“Fantastic Planet”. The Surfer has taken Dawn Greenwood to the end of the universe, and now he’s going to show her the most fantastic planet of them all: Earth! It’s your homeworld like you’ve never seen it before: with monsters, magic and…a secret that will change everything!

Toxin (2005)

Toxin or the Toxin symbiote is the third major symbiote of the Spider-Man series, the ninth known to have appeared in the comics outside of the Planet of the Symbiotes storyline, and the first symbiote that Spider-Man considers an ally, despite temporary alliances with Venom on numerous occasions. The first host of the Toxin symbiote is former NYPD police officer Patrick Mulligan. Toxin later bonded to Eddie Brock as his second host after Patrick Mulligan was killed.

 

Aladdin (1994)

Aladdin was a series of comics published by Marvel, based on the film and television spin-off of the same name. It ran for eleven issues from August 1994 to June 1995.

Daredevil (1980’s)

During the 80’s Frank Miller was hired to continue the title and did so in a similar vein to previous writer  Roger McKenzie. Resuming the drastic metamorphosis the previous writer had begun, Miller took the step of essentially ignoring all of Daredevil’s continuity prior to his run on the series; on the occasions where older villains and supporting cast were used, their characterizations and history with Daredevil were reworked or overwritten. Most prominently, dedicated and loving father Jack Murdock was reimagined as a drunkard who physically abused his son Matt, entirely revising Daredevil’s reasons for becoming a lawyer. Spider-Man villain Kingpin was introduced as Daredevil’s new nemesis, displacing most of his large rogues gallery. Daredevil himself was gradually developed into an antihero. In issue #181 (April 1982), he attempts to murder one of his arch-enemies by throwing him off a tall building; when the villain survives as a quadriplegic, he breaks into his hospital room and tries to scare him to death by playing a two-man variation on Russian roulette with a secretly unloaded gun. Comics historian Les Daniels noted that “Almost immediately, [Miller] began to attract attention with his terse tales of urban crime.” Miller’s revamping of the title was controversial among fans, but it clicked with new readers, and sales began soaring, the comic returning to monthly status just three issues after Miller came on as writer.