New Suicide Squad (2014)

This 2014 relaunch, from writer Sean Ryan and artist Jeremy Roberts, sees Deadshot and Harley Quinn teaming up with new Squad members Black Manta, Joker’s Daughter, the Reverse Flash and Deathstroke.

New Suicide Squad #9 Variant NM $6
New Suicide Squad #9 Variant NM $6
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Terminator: Secondary Objectives (1991)

The Terminator: Secondary Objectives is a four issue comic series set after the The Terminator. Secondary Objectives is the second part of four. The series was published in July 1991 by Dark Horse Comics.

After the first attack on Sarah Connor, she has fled out in the desert near Mexico City. Later in 1984, another terminator switches to its secondary mission, to track down and terminate the now pregnant Sarah Connor. Another terminator arrives to assume the primary mission of protecting the genesis of Skynet. But help is coming; Mary, Ed Astin and I825.M, a re-patriated terminator hybrid cyborg.

The series was written by James Robinson, pencilled by Paul Gulacy (who also did the cover art) and inked by Karl Kesel.

Chamber of Chills (1972)

The title was one of four launched by Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Roy Thomas to form a line of science fiction and horror anthologies with more thematic cohesiveness than the company’s earlier attempts that decade, which had included such series as Chamber of Darkness and Tower of Shadows. Whereas those titles generally presented original stories, these new books would instead adapt genre classics and other works.

With the four titles’ debuts set to be staggered over the course of four months, Marvel premiered Journey into Mystery vol. 2 (Oct. 1972),Chamber of Chills (Nov. 1972), Supernatural Thrillers (Dec. 1972), and, with a late start, Worlds Unknown (May 1973). The first issue features an original six-page story by science fiction novelist George Alec Effinger, “Moon of Madness, Moon of Fear”, penciled by P. Craig Russell (then credited as Craig Russell), and a slightly retitled adaptation of the Harlan Ellison short story “Delusions for a Dragon Slayer”, by writer Gerry Conway and artist Syd Shores; in-between was a story by writer Stan Lee and artist Russ Heath, “They Wait in Their … Dungeon”, reprinted from Menace #1 (March 1953), from Marvel’s 1950s forerunner, Atlas Comics.

The bimonthly series ran exclusively new material through issue #4, with one reprinted story added to the mix for the following two issues, and only one new story in issue #7, after which the series became all-reprint. Most of the reprinted stories were 1950s “pre-Code” horror stories, which the industry self-censorship organization the Comics Code Authority had forbidden on Code-approved comics until a loosening of the Code in 1971.

The Atom (Silver Age)

The Atom introduced in Showcase #34 (1961) is physicist and university professor Dr. Raymond Palmer, Ph.D. (He was named for real-life science fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short.) After stumbling onto a mass of white dwarf star matter that had fallen to Earth, he fashioned a lens which allowed him to shrink down to subatomic size. Originally, his size and molecular density abilities derived from the white dwarf star material of his costume, controlled by mechanisms in his belt, and later by controls in the palms of his gloves. Much later, he gained the innate equivalent powers within his own body. After the events of Identity Crisis, Ray shrank himself to microscopic size and disappeared. Finding him became a major theme of the Countdown year long series and crossover event.

 

 

Black Panther: Panther’s Prey (1990)

The Black Panther, Avenger and King of Wakanda, is taking a bride. On the way to the church he must stalk a very deadly prey to stop a drug pipeline that threatens his nation. Solomon Prey is without mercy, and he’s importing drugs into the paradise of Wakanda. Prey threatens to destroy the lives of the people with drugs, to throw T’Challa from the throne, and to kill him in mortal combat. Written by Don McGregor, with art and cover by Dwayne Turner.

 

Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham Vol 1 – Book 4: The Golden Age (2016)

At New York Comic Con 2013, Marvel announced that they had solidified their rights to Miracleman and that Neil Gaiman would finish the story he had started 25 years earlier. The series is being reprinted in a giant-sized format, with each issue containing a reprint of the corresponding issue of the Eclipse Comics series, reprints of select Mick Anglo Marvelman stories, and non-fiction material such as essays, photos, and Marvelman design sketches. The first issue, reprinting the recolored and relettered stories from Warrior #1 & 2/Miracleman #1, was released on January 15, 2014.

The reprints continued, collecting remastered and recolored work of the original run, with hardcover collections following, and in September 2014 the first new Miracleman material under the Marvel Comics banner was announced. Featuring a ‘lost’ story by Grant Morrison that he wrote in the 1980s, and drawn by Joe Quesada, it will be joined by a brand new story by Peter Milligan and Mike Allred.

The reprints proceed through #16 when the series was retitled Miracleman: The Golden Age which reprinted issues 17-22. Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham: The Silver Age issues 1 to 3 were announced for release in 2017.

 

Batman: Gotham Knights (2000’s)

Batman: Gotham Knights was a monthly American comic book series published by DC Comics. The original intent of this book was to feature the exploits of Batman and his extended family, such as Alfred PennyworthBatgirlNightwingRobinOracle, and Catwoman, among others. The latter section of the run, however, came to focus much more upon his enemies.

The series also featured the popular “Batman: Black and White” back-up strip, which allowed various artists with widely varying styles to do their take on the Dark Knight in a black and white format. These back-up strips are also collected in trade paperback form.

Flaming Carrot Comics (1980’s)

The Flaming Carrot origin states that “having read 5,000 comics in a single sitting to win a bet, this poor man suffered brain damage and appeared directly thereafter as—the Flaming Carrot!”

The Carrot, who lives in Palookaville, a neighborhood of Iron City, has staved off at least three alien invasions, a Communist take over of Iron City, flying dead dogs, the Man in the Moon, Death itself, and a cloned horde of evil marching Hitler‘s boots. Possessing no real super powers, the Carrot wins the day through sheer grit, raw determination, blinding stupidity, and bizarre luck. Flaming Carrot even died in #6 (fell into a deep toxic waste pit in Palookaville), was brought back from clinical death in #7, described his sojourn in Limbo in #8 and got back at those who sent him to Limbo in #9.

Flaming Carrot was also a founding member of the blue collar superhero group the Mystery Men, introduced in a flashback/dream sequence in Flaming Carrot Comics #16. The story of this group was later made into the 1999 movie Mystery Men and a short-lived spin-off comic book series. The Flaming Carrot himself does not appear in the film, although a handful of characters like Mr. Furious, the Shoveler, and Dr. Heller do.

Green Lantern V3 (1990’s)

Green Lantern would know a number of revivals and cancellations. Its title would change to Green Lantern Corps at one point as the popularity rose and waned. During a time there were two regular titles, each with a Green Lantern, and a third member in the Justice League. A new character, Kyle Rayner, was created to become the feature while Hal Jordan first became the villain Parallax, then died and came back as the Spectre.

Vengeance of the Moon Knight (2009)

Moon Knight returns to New York after faking his death with Jake Lockley as his dominant personality, but still struggles against his violent nature and is hounded by Khonshu in the form of a small imaginary tormentor resembling a man in the Moon Knight costume with a bird skull who goads him to kill. While trying to walk the path of a hero he makes a bold return taking on many criminals but killing none of them; now the people of New York begin to see him as a hero and not a murderous vigilante much to Norman Osborn’s disdain. Jake’s personality has been one of struggle against the inner demon trying to get him to kill while juggling sobriety.

Vengeance of the Moon Knight 1 Variant NM 19
Vengeance of the Moon Knight 1 Variant NM 19