Ms. Marvel V2 (2006)

Carol Danvers, the first character to use the moniker Ms. Marvel, first appeared in Marvel Super-Heroes #13 (March 1968) by writer Roy Thomas and artist Gene Colan as a non-superpowered officer in United States Air Force. After being caught in an explosion with the Kree superhero Captain Marvel in Captain Marvel #18 (November 1969), Danvers resurfaces in Ms. Marvel #1 (January 1977) with super powers as result of the explosion which caused her DNA to merge with Captain Marvel’s. As Ms. Marvel, Danvers becomes a mainstay of the superhero team, The Avengers beginning in The Avengers #171 (May 1978). Danvers goes on to use the codenames Binary and Warbird. In July 2012, Danvers assumes the mantle Captain Marvel in honor of its dead, original holder, Mar-Vell, after Captain America tells her that Mar-Vell would want her to have it.

Ms. Marvel V2 #43 70th Ann. Variant NM $19
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Detective Comics – New 52 (2011)

Detective Comics #1 vol. 2 (Nov. 2011) is the relaunch of Detective Comics. Story by Tony Daniel; art by Tony Daniel and Ryan Winn. The first issue of the relaunched Detective Comics has received six printings, second only to the relaunched Justice League which had seven printings.The series seventh issue was also DC Comic’s sixth highest selling digital comic, ranking above many other series in the Batman category. Scott West of Sciencefiction.com gave the series’ third arc a positive review, stating that “After last month’s disappointing ‘Night of the Owls’ tie-in issue, it’s nice to see ‘Detective Comics’ getting back to where it should be… good detective stories.” The relaunched Detective Comics received the award for “Best Series” at the 2012 Stan Lee Awards. The series’ first collected edition would reach the number one spot on The New York Times Best Seller list in the category of “Hardcover Graphic Books”.

Incredible Hulk V1 (1980’s)

In the 1980s, Banner once again gained control over the Hulk, and gained amnesty for his past rampages; however, due to the manipulations of supernatural character Nightmare, Banner eventually lost control over the Hulk. It was also established that Banner had serious mental problems even before he became the Hulk, having suffered childhood traumas that engendered Bruce’s repressed rage. Banner comes to terms with his issues for a time, and the Hulk and Banner were physically separated by Doc Samson. Banner is recruited by the U.S. government to create the Hulkbusters, a government team dedicated to catching the Hulk. Banner finally married Betty in The Incredible Hulk #319 (May 1986) following Talbot’s death in 1981. Banner and the Hulk were reunited in The Incredible Hulk #323 (Sep. 1986) and with issue #324, returned the Hulk to his grey coloration, with his transformations once again occurring at night, regardless of Banner’s emotional state. In issue #347 the grey Hulk persona “Joe Fixit” was introduced, a morally ambiguous Las Vegas enforcer and tough guy. Banner remained repressed in the Hulk’s mind for months, but slowly began to reappear.

Hellboy: Makoma (2006)

Makoma (or A Tale Told by a Mummy in the New York City Explorers’ Club on August 16, 1993) tells the story of a legendary African king, told to Hellboy by a mummy. At the same time Makoma’s story parallels Hellboy’s own life.

Hawkman (Silver Age)

Hawkman was created by writer Gardner Fox and artist Dennis Neville, the original Hawkman first appeared in Flash Comics #1, published by All-American Publications in 1940.

Several incarnations of Hawkman have appeared in DC Comics, all of them characterized by the use of archaic weaponry and by large, artificial wings, attached to a harness made from the special Nth metal that allows flight. Most incarnations of Hawkman work closely with a partner/romantic interest named Hawkgirl or Hawkwoman.

Since DC’s continuity was rewritten in the 1985 series Crisis on Infinite Earths, Hawkman’s history has become muddled with several new versions of the character appearing throughout the years, some associated with ancient Egypt and some with the fictional planet Thanagar. These versions of the character have starred in several series of various durations.

Star Wars: Purge (2005)

Purge is a comic book one-shot released on December 28, 2005 by Dark Horse Comics. The story was written by John Ostrander, and the art was done by Doug Wheatley. The events depicted take place in the Star Wars galaxy approximately one month after the events in Revenge of the Sith.

Star Wars – Purge #1 VF+ $6

Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn (1989)

Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn is a 1989-1990 limited series. The series retold the origins of Hal Jordan and how he became a Green Lantern in post-Crisis continuity. It was created by Keith Giffen and Gerard Jones, with the first issue written by Jim Owsley.

 

Wolverines (2015)

The aftermath of Wolverine’s death is explored in the series Wolverines. Sharp, Skel, Neuro, Endo, Junk, and the “Wolverines” (a team formed from the fallout of his death by Daken, Lady Deathstrike, Mystique, Sabretooth, and X-23) try to find Logan’s adamantium-covered body, which is taken by Mister Sinister. The group infiltrate Mister Sinister’s fortress to retrieve the body, but it is taken by the X-Men after a battle.

The House of Mystery (1970’s)

With issue #174, EC Comics veteran Joe Orlando was hired by DC to take over as editor of House of Mystery. As the Comics Code Authority was now being challenged by both DC and Marvel over content restrictions, the series returned to its overt horror themes. The first issue under Orlando would be a reprint issue of old horror/suspense stories, as the new direction would truly begin with #175 (July–August 1968). The issue would introduce a new figure to the series, Cain, the “able care taker” of the House of Mystery who would introduce nearly all stories that would run in the series before its cancellation. Cain would also host the spin-off humor series Plop! and later become a recurring character in Blue Devil and The Sandman.

Artist Bernie Wrightson‘s first professional comic work was the story “The Man Who Murdered Himself” which appeared in issue #179 (March–April 1969)

House of Mystery was in the Dollar Comics format for issues #251 (March–April 1977) to #259 (July–August 1978).  House of Mystery featured stories by writers T. Casey Brennan (#260, 267, 268 and 274) and Scott Edelman (#257, 258, 260, 264, 266, 270, 272, 273). Orlando’s tenure as editor ended with #257 (March–April 1978).

 

The Incredible Hulk V1 (Silver Age)

The Hulk first appeared in The Incredible Hulk #1 (cover dated May 1962), written by writer-editor Stan Lee, penciled and co-plotted by Jack Kirby, and inked by Paul Reinman. Lee cites influence from Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in the Hulk’s creation. The Hulk’s original series was canceled with issue #6 (March 1963).

In the debut, Lee chose gray for the Hulk because he wanted a color that did not suggest any particular ethnic group. Colorist Stan Goldberg, however, had problems with the gray coloring, resulting in different shades of grey, and even green, in the issue. After seeing the first published issue, Lee chose to change the skin color to green. Green was used in retellings of the origin, with even reprints of the original story being recolored for the next two decades, until The Incredible Hulk vol. 2, #302 (December 1984) reintroduced the gray Hulk in flashbacks set close to the origin story. Since then, reprints of the first issue have displayed the original gray coloring, with the fictional canon specifying that the Hulk’s skin had initially been grey. An exception is the early trade paperback, Origins of Marvel Comics, from 1974, which explains the difficulties in keeping the gray color consistent in a Stan Lee written prologue, and reprints the origin story keeping the gray coloration.

Lee gave the Hulk’s alter ego the alliterative name Bruce Banner because he found he had less difficulty remembering alliterative names. Despite this, in later stories he misremembered the character’s name and referred to him as “Bob Banner”, an error which readers quickly picked up on. The discrepancy was resolved by giving the character the official full name of Robert Bruce Banner.