Dark Horse Comics (1992)

This monthly, color anthology from 1992 featured some of the hottest properties and creators anywhere. Many of the storylines presented in the pages of Dark Horse Comics have spun off into their own monthly series.

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The Nail (2004)

Musician, Rob Zombie has also done work with comic books, having numerous series available. His Spookshow International series launched in November 2003, and went on to produce nine editions, with the last coming out in July 2004. His second series, The Nail, spawned four issues between June and October 2004, while his Bigfoot series lasted from February to May 2005, spawning four issues. The Devil’s Rejects was a set of comics based after Zombie’s film of the same name, while The Haunted World of El Superbeasto would later be turned into Zombie’s first animated film. Zombie’s seventh and latest series, Whatever Happened to Baron Von Shock? spawned four issues in 2010.

John Byrne’s 2112 (1991)

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as “Freaks” in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics, but the series never surfaced there. With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112, to become the John Byrne’s Next Men series. Two characters from the “Freaks” artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine and villain Aldus Hilltop.

The Next Men officially debuted in a four-part storyline in Dark Horse Presents #54-57 (later reprinted, in color, as John Byrne’s Next Men #0). The series ran until issue #30 and ended with a cliffhanger. According to Byrne, he intended the series to be science-fiction that had a “sort of smell” of being a super-hero book. In addition to exploring mature topics such as sex, abortion, and child abuse, Byrne also set aside some of the more-traditional conventions of the medium, such as “thought-bubbles” and sound-effects.

Byrne had intended to conclude the story in a second series after a six-month hiatus, but the collapse of the American comic-book industry in the mid-1990s made it financially unfeasible for him to do so, and he returned to working for hire at DC Comics and Marvel Comics.

The Terminator (1990)

A nine-man Resistance cell led by Colonel Mary Randallassaults a fully functional Skynet network complex 6 months after John Connor destroyed the Master Control central node. Within this facility is an operational Time Displacement Chamber, greater in scope than the prototype discovered by John Connor. Their mission is to utilize the TDE to return to 1984 and eliminate Skynet by killing key individuals in the Cyberdyne Systems hierarchy. 

Star Wars: Darth Maul – Death Sentence (2012)

Darth Maul—Death Sentence 1 is the first issue of four in the Star Wars: Darth Maul—Death Sentence comic mini-series written by Tom Taylor.

By now the galaxy has learned the terrible truth: Sith Lord Darth Maul still lives. Worse, he has joined forces with his brother Savage Opress!

The Jedi are searching for them and, after Maul and Opress cut a murderous swath through the Outer Rim, so is an army of mercenaries hired by a wealthy mine owner.

Darth Maul has a price on his head, and for him there is only one way to deal with such a problem: go directly to the source!

Star Wars: Darth Maul – Death Sentence #1 $9

Tank Girl V2 (1993)

Tank Girl is a British comic created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. The eponymous character Tank Girl (Rebecca Buck) drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic’s style was heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips were frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plotor committed narrative.

The strip was initially set in a stylized post-apocalyptic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture.

Freaks of the Heartland (2004)

Trevor Owen has a younger brother who lives in the barn behind the house, too monstrous to be let into the house. The boy’s only six years old, but he towers over his older brother, and possesses monstrous strength. For years, Trevor has looked after his baby brother, keeping him from the light, but now that’s all about to change. His family’s profane secret is about to be revealed, uncovering the horrible truth of the small mid-western town the boys have grown up in.

Freaks of the Heartland #1 NM $8

Sin City – The Big Fat Kill (1994)

Sin City – The Big Fat Kill is a five-issue limited series published by Dark Horse Comics in November 1994. The series, written and Illustrated by Frank Miller, is one of three from Sin City related in the film Sin City. In the film, Clive Owen plays Dwight, Brittany Murphy plays Shellie, Benicio del Toro plays Jack, Rosario Dawson plays Gail, Devon Aoki plays Miho, Alexis Bledel plays Becky, and Michael Clarke Duncan plays Manute.

A notable difference from the comic version is that Becky survives the final gunfight by hiding in a nook in the alley, leaving her alive for the final “epilogue” scene of the movie which ends when she meets The Salesman from The Customer is Always Right, who had been introduced in the movie’s prologue. He then offers her a cigarette just like he did in The Customer is Always Right, and Becky seems to sense why he’s there and tells her mother she loves her before hanging up.

Star Wars – Dark Times: Out of the Wilderness (2011)

Dark Times is a 2006, 33 issue (32 + a ‘zero issue’) comic book mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics. It is part of their 30th anniversary retooling of its long-running Star Wars series of comics, replacing Star Wars: Republic.

The first issue was released on November 8, 2006, and is written by Mick Harrison from a plot by Welles Hartley.

The series is set in the Star Wars galaxy shortly after the events in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, and about 19 years before Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. The story begins in the days following the events in Purge by John Ostrander, and intertwines with the events of Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader by James Luceno.

The Goon – Once Upon a Hard Time (2015)

After the tragic events of Occasion of Revenge, the witch coven believes that control of the unnamed town will soon be in their grasp and the Goon’s tragic soul will contribute to the curse that increases their power. But has their plot destroyed the Goon or created a monster too savage for them to withstand?