The Incredibles (2004)

Based on the smash cinematic blockbuster, this graphic novelization recounts the reawakening of dormant heroism that has seemingly been stifled by social conformity and lowered mid-life expectations. Bob Parr, his wife Helen, daughter Violet, son Dash, and baby Jack-Jack grapple with the banality of a comfortable suburban existence and yearn to reaffirm their individuality by expressing their unique “super”-powers.

Unlike most movie adaptations, this succeeds in both being faithful to and expanding the original plotline. It helps when the artist is a Pixar storyboarder and the writer is the film’s director. Serving up high quality art and narrative, this tale lives up to expectations.

 

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Predator V1 (1989)

The events of Predator #1-4 revolve around NYC Detective Schaefer, the brother of Major Alan “Dutch” Schaefer. Detective Schaefer and his partner, Detective Rasche, discover a Predator in New York City during a drug deal gone bad. Schaefer believes the Predator and a mysterious army general have a connection to his brother, Dutch, which leads Schaefer on a hunt into Colombia. There in South America Schaefer has yet another run in with a Predator as well as a Colombian drug lord – an old NYC adversary. Successfully eluding both, Schaefer is transported back to the U.S. only to find a government plot to hand him over to the Predators. Predator #1-4 are collected together as the trade paperback: Predator: Concrete Jungle. The title should not be confused with the game of the same name. The story was also presented as a paperback mass market novel which closely follows the events depicted in the comic.

The Goon – Once Upon a Hard Time (2015)

After the tragic events of Occasion of Revenge, the witch coven believes that control of the unnamed town will soon be in their grasp and the Goon’s tragic soul will contribute to the curse that increases their power. But has their plot destroyed the Goon or created a monster too savage for them to withstand?

Predator: Big Game (1991)

Predator: Big Game was written by John Arcudi, illustrated by Evan Dorkin, inked by Armando Gil, colored by Julia Lacquement, lettered by Kurt Hathaway and edited by Diana Schutz, with cover art by Chris Warner. The comic was later adapted as a novel of the same name by Sandy Schofield.

Big Game was eventually followed by a direct sequel, Predator: Blood on Two-Witch Mesa, which continued the adventurea of Big Game’s lead character.

 

Next Men V1 (1992)

The Next Men characters made a prototypical appearance as “Freaks” in a lithography plate that was published within the History of the DC Universe Portfolio in 1986. Byrne had originally pitched the series to DC Comics, but the series never surfaced there. With some changes, Byrne changed the concept to fit in with his work on the graphic novel 2112, to become the John Byrne’s Next Men series. Two characters from the “Freaks” artwork somewhat retained their physical looks and became the lead characters of the Next Men series: heroine Jasmine and villain Aldus Hilltop.

 

Manga Darkchylde (2005)

Darkchylde creator Randy Queen returns to write, draw, and re-imagine for an all- ages audience the character that made him famous!

In this first- ever, comic book release of Manga Darkchylde, the Sinister Sisters of Shadow have come to Salem, Georgia to seek an audience with a girl named Ariel Chylde! The same girl who just discovered she can become any of the creatures from her nightmares! Poor Ariel’s still just trying to adjust, and only wants to use her curse for good, but these creepy Sisters surely have something more sinister in mind!

Terminator (1991)

This beautifully illustrated 48-page trade paperback spotlights writer James Robinson, who delivers a compelling and action-packed script which plays to Matt Wagner’s atmospheric and visually stunning renderings. Unknowingly, Kyle Reese went back in time to protect Sarah Conner from the second of two Terminators sent from the future to alter the past. In this one-shot special, we encounter the very first Terminator to be sent back through time, a female version of the 800-model, but just as deadly, if not more so. Her mission: to kill John Conner’s mother! The Sarah Conner that she finds has a mission of her own: to kill her new husband and take off with his vast wealth before ever having a baby!

Terminator (One Shot) NM $7

Give Me Liberty: An American Dream (1990)

Give Me Liberty is a four-issue mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics in 1990. It was created and written by Frank Miller and drawn by Dave Gibbons. The title of the series comes from a famous quotation by Patrick Henry: “I know not what course others may take but — as for me — give me liberty or give me death.”

Give Me Liberty was one of Frank Miller’s two creator-owned (the other was Hard Boiled) titles he took to Dark Horse after deciding to stop working for DC Comics after a dispute over a proposed ratings system.

The story is set in a dystopian near-future where the United States have split into several extremist factions, and tells the story of Martha Washington, a young American girl from a public housing project called “The Green” (see Chicago‘s Cabrini–Green). The series starts with Martha’s birth and sees her slowly grow up from someone struggling to break free of the public housing project, to being a war hero and major figure in deciding the fate of the United States.

The series was a mix of Miller’s typical action sequences as well as being a political satire of the United States and its major corporations. The series proved to be a huge success for Dark Horse and was one of the biggest selling independent comics of the time. A trade paperback was later released and Miller followed up Give Me Liberty with several sequels continuing the story. All of these sequels were drawn by Dave Gibbons and published by Dark Horse.

 

Ghost in the Shell- Dark Horse (1995)

In this cyberpunk iteration of a possible future, computer technology has advanced to the point that many members of the public possess cyberbrains, technology that allows them to interface their biological brain with various networks. The level of cyberization varies from simple minimal interfaces to almost complete replacement of the brain with cybernetic parts, in cases of severe trauma. This can also be combined with various levels of prostheses, with a fully prosthetic body enabling a person to become a cyborg. The heroine of Ghost in the Shell, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is such a cyborg, having had a terrible accident befall her as a child that ultimately required that she use a full-body prosthesis to house her cyberbrain. This high level of cyberization, however, opens the brain up to attacks from highly skilled hackers, with the most dangerous being those who will hack a person to bend to their whims.

 

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction (1993)

Before Hellboy was published independently at Dark Horse Comics, the concept was initially pitched to a board of directors for DC Comics, who loved it, but did not like the idea of it involving “Hell”.

The early stories were conceived and drawn by Mignola with a script written by John Byrne and some later stories have been crafted by creators other than Mignola, including Christopher Golden, Guy Davis, Ryan Sook, and Duncan Fegredo. The increasing commitments from the Hellboy franchise meant that the 2008 one-shot In the Chapel of Moloch was the first Hellboy comic Mignola had provided the script and art for since The Island in 2005.