Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (2006)

Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic is a 2006 monthly Star Wars comic book series published by Dark Horse Comics. It takes place in the same timeline as the video games of the same name, eight years prior to the first game. The series ran for 50 issues.

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Ghost (1990’s)

Ghost first appeared in Comics’ Greatest World, week three, in 1993. After a popular special in 1994, a monthly title devoted to the character began publication in 1995. It ran for 36 issues, followed by a six-month break and a second series of 22 issues. The second series was a continuation of the first with a number of changes, including new details about Ghost’s origin. The stories in both series were based in (and around) the city of Arcadia, in a self-contained fictional universe outlined in Dark Horse’s Comics’ Greatest World.

Ghost continued appearing in her own titles (and others) into the 2000s, including several crossovers unrelated to Comics’ Greatest World. Most notable among these were a two-issue crossover with Dark Horse’s Hellboy (Ghost/Hellboy), and a four-issue crossover with DC Comics’ Batgirl (Ghost/Batgirl: The Resurrection Machine). Ghost was ranked 15th on the Comics Buyer’s Guide‘s “100 Sexiest Women in Comics” list.

Aliens: Earth War (1990)

Aliens: Earth War was a continuation of the events from Aliens (series 1) (1988) and Aliens (series 2) (1989), originally featuring the continuing adventures of the characters Newt and Dwayne Hicks from the film Aliens, and also reintroducing Alien-film-franchise heroine Lt. Ellen Ripley.

For later printings, after the release of the film Alien³, the story was retitled Aliens: The Female War, and the names/identities of the lead characters were changed to Billie and Wilks, since Newt and Hicks were killed off at the start of the film, and the Ellen Ripley who appears in the story is said to be a synthetic version of Ripley, who was killed off at the film’s end. As such, the story, as Aliens: The Female War, the story still stands as part of Aliens comics/novel continuity; and Billie, Wilks, and the Ellen Ripley synthetic have all become completely separate characters.

Star Wars Lost Tribe of the Sith: Spiral (2012)

On a planet ruled by a tribe of Sith—marooned thousands of years ago and cut off from the galaxy—the throne holder is about to be challenged by a power-hungry Sith rebel from the slums . . . and a thwarted royal Sith princess! Their few shared interests set them on a quest together—but most certainly not as partners!

The saga of the lost tribe continues in comics, following the release of John Jackson Miller’s Lost Tribe of the Sith: The Collected Stories.

Tank Girl V2 (1993)

Tank Girl is a British comic created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. The eponymous character Tank Girl (Rebecca Buck) drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic’s style was heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips were frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plotor committed narrative.

The strip was initially set in a stylized post-apocalyptic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture.

Star Wars: Darth Maul – Death Sentence (2012)

Darth Maul—Death Sentence 1 is the first issue of four in the Star Wars: Darth Maul—Death Sentence comic mini-series written by Tom Taylor.

By now the galaxy has learned the terrible truth: Sith Lord Darth Maul still lives. Worse, he has joined forces with his brother Savage Opress!

The Jedi are searching for them and, after Maul and Opress cut a murderous swath through the Outer Rim, so is an army of mercenaries hired by a wealthy mine owner.

Darth Maul has a price on his head, and for him there is only one way to deal with such a problem: go directly to the source!

Star Wars Darth Maul Death Sentence #1 $9
Star Wars Darth Maul Death Sentence #1 $9

The Nail (2004)

Musician, Rob Zombie has also done work with comic books, having numerous series available. His Spookshow International series launched in November 2003, and went on to produce nine editions, with the last coming out in July 2004. His second series, The Nail, spawned four issues between June and October 2004, while his Bigfoot series lasted from February to May 2005, spawning four issues. The Devil’s Rejects was a set of comics based after Zombie’s film of the same name, while The Haunted World of El Superbeasto would later be turned into Zombie’s first animated film. Zombie’s seventh and latest series, Whatever Happened to Baron Von Shock? spawned four issues in 2010.

The Incredibles (2004)

Based on the smash cinematic blockbuster, this graphic novelization recounts the reawakening of dormant heroism that has seemingly been stifled by social conformity and lowered mid-life expectations. Bob Parr, his wife Helen, daughter Violet, son Dash, and baby Jack-Jack grapple with the banality of a comfortable suburban existence and yearn to reaffirm their individuality by expressing their unique “super”-powers.

Unlike most movie adaptations, this succeeds in both being faithful to and expanding the original plotline. It helps when the artist is a Pixar storyboarder and the writer is the film’s director. Serving up high quality art and narrative, this tale lives up to expectations.

Give Me Liberty: An American Dream

Give Me Liberty is a four-issue mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics in 1990. It was created and written by Frank Miller and drawn by Dave Gibbons. The title of the series comes from a famous quotation by Patrick Henry: “I know not what course others may take but — as for me — give me liberty or give me death.”

Give Me Liberty was one of Frank Miller’s two creator-owned (the other was Hard Boiled) titles he took to Dark Horse after deciding to stop working for DC Comics after a dispute over a proposed ratings system.

The story is set in a dystopian near-future where the United States have split into several extremist factions, and tells the story of Martha Washington, a young American girl from a public housing project called “The Green” (see Chicago‘s Cabrini–Green). The series starts with Martha’s birth and sees her slowly grow up from someone struggling to break free of the public housing project, to being a war hero and major figure in deciding the fate of the United States.

The series was a mix of Miller’s typical action sequences as well as being a political satire of the United States and its major corporations. The series proved to be a huge success for Dark Horse and was one of the biggest selling independent comics of the time. A trade paperback was later released and Miller followed up Give Me Liberty with several sequels continuing the story. All of these sequels were drawn by Dave Gibbons and published by Dark Horse.

Sin City – The Big Fat Kill (1994)

Sin City – The Big Fat Kill is a five-issue limited series published by Dark Horse Comics in November 1994. The series, written and Illustrated by Frank Miller, is one of three from Sin City related in the film Sin City. In the film, Clive Owen plays Dwight, Brittany Murphy plays Shellie, Benicio del Toro plays Jack, Rosario Dawson plays Gail, Devon Aoki plays Miho, Alexis Bledel plays Becky, and Michael Clarke Duncan plays Manute.

A notable difference from the comic version is that Becky survives the final gunfight by hiding in a nook in the alley, leaving her alive for the final “epilogue” scene of the movie which ends when she meets The Salesman from The Customer is Always Right, who had been introduced in the movie’s prologue. He then offers her a cigarette just like he did in The Customer is Always Right, and Becky seems to sense why he’s there and tells her mother she loves her before hanging up.