Godzilla: Color Special (1992)

In 1987, Dark Horse Comics acquired the rights to Godzilla and for the next 12 years published various comic books and trade paperbacks based on the character. These ran the gamut from back-up stories in anthology titles, to one-shots, to miniseries, to an ongoing series, as well as various reprints in the trade paperback format.

In 1992, an illustration of Godzilla (provided by Arthur Adams) was published in San Diego Comic Con Comics #1. Also that same year the one-shot issue Godzilla Color Special #1 was published. It would be reprinted as simply Dark Horse Classics: Godzilla #1 in 1998.

Godzilla Color Special #1 NM $9
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Godzilla, King of the Monsters (1995)

In 1987, Dark Horse Comics acquired the rights to Godzilla and for the next 12 years published various comic books and trade paperbacks based on the character. These ran the gamut from back-up stories in anthology titles, to one-shots, to miniseries, to an ongoing series, as well as various reprints in the trade paperback format.

In 1993, Godzilla was featured in the anthology series Dark Horse Comics in issues #10 and #11 (parts of Dark Horse Comics #10’s story and artwork would be slightly altered twice in both Godzilla, King of the Monsters #0 and the trade paperback Godzilla: Age of Monsters).

Godzilla King of Monsters #0 VF-NM $7

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction (1993)

Before Hellboy was published independently at Dark Horse Comics, the concept was initially pitched to a board of directors for DC Comics, who loved it, but did not like the idea of it involving “Hell”.

The early stories were conceived and drawn by Mignola with a script written by John Byrne and some later stories have been crafted by creators other than Mignola, including Christopher Golden, Guy Davis, Ryan Sook, and Duncan Fegredo. The increasing commitments from the Hellboy franchise meant that the 2008 one-shot In the Chapel of Moloch was the first Hellboy comic Mignola had provided the script and art for since The Island in 2005.

Ghost (1990’s)

Ghost first appeared in Comics’ Greatest World, week three, in 1993. After a popular special in 1994, a monthly title devoted to the character began publication in 1995. It ran for 36 issues, followed by a six-month break and a second series of 22 issues. The second series was a continuation of the first with a number of changes, including new details about Ghost’s origin. The stories in both series were based in (and around) the city of Arcadia, in a self-contained fictional universe outlined in Dark Horse’s Comics’ Greatest World.

Ghost continued appearing in her own titles (and others) into the 2000s, including several crossovers unrelated to Comics’ Greatest World. Most notable among these were a two-issue crossover with Dark Horse’s Hellboy (Ghost/Hellboy), and a four-issue crossover with DC Comics’ Batgirl (Ghost/Batgirl: The Resurrection Machine). Ghost was ranked 15th on the Comics Buyer’s Guide‘s “100 Sexiest Women in Comics” list.

Aliens: Earth War (1990)

Aliens: Earth War was a continuation of the events from Aliens (series 1) (1988) and Aliens (series 2) (1989), originally featuring the continuing adventures of the characters Newt and Dwayne Hicks from the film Aliens, and also reintroducing Alien-film-franchise heroine Lt. Ellen Ripley.

For later printings, after the release of the film Alien³, the story was retitled Aliens: The Female War, and the names/identities of the lead characters were changed to Billie and Wilks, since Newt and Hicks were killed off at the start of the film, and the Ellen Ripley who appears in the story is said to be a synthetic version of Ripley, who was killed off at the film’s end. As such, the story, as Aliens: The Female War, the story still stands as part of Aliens comics/novel continuity; and Billie, Wilks, and the Ellen Ripley synthetic have all become completely separate characters.

 

Star Wars Lost Tribe of the Sith: Spiral (2012)

On a planet ruled by a tribe of Sith—marooned thousands of years ago and cut off from the galaxy—the throne holder is about to be challenged by a power-hungry Sith rebel from the slums . . . and a thwarted royal Sith princess! Their few shared interests set them on a quest together—but most certainly not as partners!

The saga of the lost tribe continues in comics, following the release of John Jackson Miller’s Lost Tribe of the Sith: The Collected Stories.

Tank Girl V2 (1993)

Tank Girl is a British comic created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. The eponymous character Tank Girl (Rebecca Buck) drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic’s style was heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips were frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plotor committed narrative.

The strip was initially set in a stylized post-apocalyptic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture.

Concrete (1987)

The series focuses on the life of Concrete, formerly Ron Lithgow, whose brain was involuntarily transplanted by aliens into a hulking artificial body which is made up of a substance that closely resembles concrete.

As part of the back-story, he eventually escaped and made contact with the US Senator he worked for as a speechwriter. After a prolonged period of scientific tests and examinations, he was allowed to live on his own with the cover story that he was a cyborg constructed by the government.

The Thing from Another World (1991)

The Thing from Another World is the first of the comic series published by Dark Horse Comics. The series acted as a continuation of the 1982 film The Thing, with three stories (The Thing from Another World, The Thing from Another World: Climate of Fear and The Thing from Another World: Eternal Vows) directly following its events, and a serialized visual novel (The Thing from Another World: Questionable Research) which ignored the preceding stories and acted as a separate stand-alone sequel to the film.

Star Wars: Darth Maul – Death Sentence (2012)

Darth Maul—Death Sentence 1 is the first issue of four in the Star Wars: Darth Maul—Death Sentence comic mini-series written by Tom Taylor.

By now the galaxy has learned the terrible truth: Sith Lord Darth Maul still lives. Worse, he has joined forces with his brother Savage Opress!

The Jedi are searching for them and, after Maul and Opress cut a murderous swath through the Outer Rim, so is an army of mercenaries hired by a wealthy mine owner.

Darth Maul has a price on his head, and for him there is only one way to deal with such a problem: go directly to the source!

Star Wars: Darth Maul – Death Sentence #1 $9