Vampire Hunter D (2016)

Drawn to Mars by an ancient message from Cecile, a girl who could see the future, D arrives to find a colony that is little more than a blood farm. With Left Hand by his side, D sets out to cleanse Mars of the vampire scourge.

Vampire Hunter D #1 NM $4
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Dawn (1995)

Dawn is the goddess of birth and rebirth. While her appearance depends on who is viewing her, she is generally depicted as a young, red-haired woman with three “tears” running from her left eye (and two running from her right eye, on the few occasions that it has been shown); during the witch hunt, witches were discovered to only cry from their left eyes. She also has a rose on one wrist and a chain on the other. The rose represents Hell, and although it has beauty, it only pricks and hurts a person; the chain represents Heaven because a person can only go so far before they are stopped short by its restrictions. Dawn is the guardian of all the witches on Earth, and the goddess to whom they pray.

Dawn is shown in many different facets, shapes, sizes, and colors. She is generally depicted as a woman; Joseph Michael Linsner stresses that all women are goddesses. Dawn takes many shapes since all shapes are beautiful, and so are all women.

Solar, Man of the Atom (1991)

Valiant’s Solar, Man of the Atom began with three multi-part stories all written by Jim Shooter: “Alpha and Omega” with artwork by Barry Windsor-Smith and Bob Layton, spanned the first ten issues and told of the origin story of how the protagonist, Phil Seleski, became Solar, until the time he accidentally destroys the world; “Second Death”, with artwork by Don Perlin, Bob Layton and Thomas Ryder, spanned the first four issues and tells of Seleski’s attempt to prevent another version of himself from destroying the world; “First Strike”, with artwork by Don Perlin and Stan Drake, spanned issues #5 to #8 and follows Solar as he fights spider aliens. These first year stories included first appearances by Eternal Warrior, the Harbinger FoundationGeomancers, and the X-O Manowar armor – all of which would be spun off into their own series.

Walt Disney’s Vacation in Disneyland #1 Gold Key Reprint (1964)

Celebrates Disneyland’s Tenth Anniversary. 6 photo’s of Disneyland on the interior cover pages.

Elfquest (1978)

Elfquest (or ElfQuest) is a cult hit comic book property created by Wendy and Richard Pini in 1978. It is a fantasy story about a community of elves and other fictional species who struggle to survive and coexist on a primitive Earth-like planet with two moons. Several published volumes of prose fiction also share the same setting. Elfquest was one of the first comic book series to have a planned conclusion. Over the years Elfquest has been self-published by the Pinis through their own company Warp Graphics, then Marvel Comics,[ then the Pinis again, more recently DC Comics and then Dark Horse Comics.

Echo (2008)

Echo‘s story revolves around Julie, a young photographer who inadvertently discovers a high-techbattle suit. Terry Moore has said the premise of Echo is a woman living in today’s America who is dealing with a sudden unbelievable change to her daily life.

Warrior Nun Areala (1994)

Warrior Nun Areala is a manga-style American comic book character created by Ben Dunn and published by Antarctic Press, first appearing in Warrior Nun Areala Vol. 1 #1 in December 1994. The story revolves around Sister Shannon Masters, a Joan of Arc like heroine of the Order of the Cruciform Sword, a fictional military order of Warrior Nuns and Magic Priests in service of the Catholic Church. The order was created in 1066 when a Valkyrie named Auria renounced her pagan ways and turned to Jesus Christ for salvation; ever since then, Auria, now Areala, has chosen an avatar every generation to carry on the mission. In modern times, this has grown to a world spanning organization in the service of the Catholic Church with the current Areala, Sister Shannon Masters as the best and brightest. With her friends beside her, Sister Shannon has led the forces of good against those of evil, ever serving the Lord with faith and humility. 

Black Hole (1995)

Black Hole written and drawn by Charles Burns was published as a 12-issue comic book limited series between 1995 and 2005. The first four issues were released by Kitchen Sink Press, before the publisher went out of business. Fantagraphics republished the first four issues and the remaining eight.

Set in the suburbs of Seattle during the 1970s, the story follows a group of teenagers who contract a mysterious sexually transmitted disease referred to as “the Bug, which causes them to develop bizarre unique physical mutations and subsequently become social outcasts, many of them running away from home to live in the nearby woodland.

Black Hole #1 NM $39

 

Shadowman V1 (1992)

Shadowman debuted in 1992 as a flagship title in the Valiant Universe and became one of the industry’s most popular comic books. After one year in publication, Shadowman was selling over 100,000 comics books a month. By its second year, Shadowman was outselling long-standing industry stalwarts from Marvel Comics and DC Comics.

Shadowman continued strongly with sales in the hundreds of thousands of books per month (ultimately selling more than 5 million copies altogether) until 1996 when Acclaim Entertainment, which bought Valiant for $65 million, started a new Shadowman series under the Acclaim Comics banner.

Shadowman V1 #1 NM $19

The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves (1967)

Following his introduction as Dr. M. T. Graves in Charlton Comics‘ Ghostly Tales #55 (cover-dated May 1966) in the three-page story “The Ghost Fighter” by writer-artist Ernie Bache, the character went on to host his own anthology title, The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves. The series ran 72 issues (May 1967 – May 1982), generally published bimonthly. Following issue #60 (Jan. 1977), the title went on hiatus for seven months until issue #61 (Aug. 1977) before being canceled with #65 (May 1978). Charlton revived the title three years later with #66 (May 1981) before canceling it once more six issues later.

 The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves#54 (Dec. 1973). The cover art is among the earliest professional works of John Byrne. Three additional issues consisting solely of reprints, and titled simply Dr. Graves, were published as issues #73-75 (Sept. 1985 – Jan. 1986).

Among the artists whose work appeared were Steve Ditko, following his falling-out with Marvel Comics; newcomer Jim Aparo, later to be one of Batman‘s signature artists; regular Charlton talents including Vince AlasciaPat BoyettePete MorisiRocke Mastroserio, and Charles Nicholas; and such others as Rich LarsonDon Newton and Tom Sutton. The cover of issue #54 (Dec. 1975) marks one of the earliest professional works of John Byrne.

Writers on the title included Ditko, Steve SkeatesMike Pellowski, and the prolific, generally uncredited staff writer Joe Gill.