Shock SuspenStories (1952)

Shock SuspenStories was part of the EC Comics line in the early 1950s. The bi-monthly comic, published by Bill Gaines and edited by Al Feldstein, began with issue 1 in February/March 1952. Over a four-year span, it ran for 18 issues, ending with the December/January 1955 issue.

Front covers were by Feldstein, Wally WoodJohnny CraigGeorge Evans and Jack Kamen. Kamen was the comic’s most prolific artist, usually doing the lead eight-page story in each issue. Other stories were illustrated by Craig, Evans, Wood, Graham IngelsJack DavisAl WilliamsonJoe OrlandoReed CrandallBernard Krigstein and Frank Frazetta. Writing was handled by Gaines and Feldstein exclusively through the first 12 issues with the exception of a single story written by Craig. Over the last 6 issues other writers that contributed included Carl Wessler, Otto Binder, and Jack Oleck.

Issue 13 featured “Squeeze Play”, the only solo story Frank Frazetta drew for EC.

Shock Suspenstories #15 G+ $65
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Cyberfrog V1 Harris (1996)

In an attempt to spead peace and knowledge throughout the universe, a plan was formed to send out unseeded energy masses to distant planets inside high technology living sentient robots, known as the Sinn. The Sinn was to be the ‘first parent’. On Earth, a human was to be the ‘second parent’.Aboard the vessel named Kjell Sinn was the energy mass named Trikk Rhan, the son of Sicha Rhan and his mate Kjell Rhan.

A crash landing on Earth in a swamp caused the energy mass to release early. As it leaked out, the Sinn was the first contact as planned. But the energy mass of Trikk Rhan came into contact with a bullfrog. The result was a surly hero who enjoys fried chicken, caffeine and violence.

Cyberfrog #2 Harris NM $29

Radioactive Man V1 (1994)

Radioactive Man was one of the four “premiere” series released by Bongo Comics in late 1993. The series has been released in two volumes, an early run from 1993–1994, and the current run that’s been going on since 2000. Smaller Radioactive Man stories have also been published in Simpsons Comics. As a tie-in promotion of The Simpsons Movie a special “Radioactive Man Comic Book Edition #711” was sold at 7-Elevens as part of their Kwik-E-Mart promotion.

Ripley’s Believe It or Not!

For generations, Ripley’s Believe It or Not! told tales of the bizarre and uncanny, but which “were absolutely true—believe it or not!” In doing so, Ripley has introduced readers to everything from child prodigies who composed masterpieces before they turned 12, to great islands built by people throwing pebbles off into the water over a period of several generations.

In this series, previously entitled “True War Stories,” Ripley tends to stretch the bounds of credibility. Readers who do not dispute the existence of spirits may have trouble believing these thrilling tales of ghost ships, hauntings, and other supernatural phenomena. Then again, Ripley has always known how to tell a good yarn—whether you believe it or not!

Vengeance of Vampirella (1990’s)

Upon Warren’s bankruptcy shortly afterward, Harris Publications acquired the company assets at auction in August 1983, although legal murkiness and a 1999 lawsuit by Warren publisher James Warren resulted in his re-acquisition of the rights to sister publications Creepy and Eerie. Harris Comics published Vampirella stories in various series and miniseries from 1991 to 2007. Harris also published Vampirella #113, a one-issue continuation of the original series, containing solely reprinted stories, in 1988.

 

Star Trek: Mission’s End (2009)

The series centers around the artificial planet Archernar IV and it’s two native sentient species, the Archernariansand Crawlers. The series begins at the start of the Enterprise‘s five-year mission at the start of contact with Archernar, and then skips ahead to the Enterprise‘s final mission to the planet as it prepares to join the Federation. At the conclusion of the Archernar mission the Enterprise returns to Earth, with the crew moved by the mission to take on new roles, as seen at the start of Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

 

Jughead V3 (2015)

Jughead, was released in October 2015 as part of Archie Comics’ New Riverdale. It is written by Chip Zdarsky with artwork by Erica Henderson. Derek Charm took over as regular artist starting with issue #7.

 

Jughead V3 #9C Variant NM- $24

From Hell (1989)

From Hell is a graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell, originally published in serial form from 1989 to 1996 and collected in 1999. Set during the Whitechapel murders of the late Victorian era, the novel speculates upon the identity and motives of Jack the Ripper. The novel depicts several true events of the murders, although portions have been fictionalised, particularly the identity of the killer and the precise nature and circumstances of the murders. The title is taken from the first words of the “From Hell” letter, which some authorities believe was an authentic message sent from the killer in 1888.

Vampirella: Morning in America (1991)

Upon Warren’s bankruptcy, Harris Publications acquired the company assets at auction in August 1983, although legal murkiness and a 1999 lawsuit by Warren publisher James Warren resulted in his reacquisition of the rights to sister publications Creepy and EerieHarris Comics published Vampirella stories in various series and miniseries from 1991 to 2007. Harris also published Vampirella #113, a one-issue continuation of the original series, containing solely reprinted stories, in 1988.

The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves (1967)

Following his introduction as Dr. M. T. Graves in Charlton Comics‘ Ghostly Tales #55 (cover-dated May 1966) in the three-page story “The Ghost Fighter” by writer-artist Ernie Bache, the character went on to host his own anthology title, The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves. The series ran 72 issues (May 1967 – May 1982), generally published bimonthly. Following issue #60 (Jan. 1977), the title went on hiatus for seven months until issue #61 (Aug. 1977) before being canceled with #65 (May 1978). Charlton revived the title three years later with #66 (May 1981) before canceling it once more six issues later.

 The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves#54 (Dec. 1973). The cover art is among the earliest professional works of John Byrne. Three additional issues consisting solely of reprints, and titled simply Dr. Graves, were published as issues #73-75 (Sept. 1985 – Jan. 1986).

Among the artists whose work appeared were Steve Ditko, following his falling-out with Marvel Comics; newcomer Jim Aparo, later to be one of Batman‘s signature artists; regular Charlton talents including Vince AlasciaPat BoyettePete MorisiRocke Mastroserio, and Charles Nicholas; and such others as Rich LarsonDon Newton and Tom Sutton. The cover of issue #54 (Dec. 1975) marks one of the earliest professional works of John Byrne.

Writers on the title included Ditko, Steve SkeatesMike Pellowski, and the prolific, generally uncredited staff writer Joe Gill.