Jughead V3 (2015)

Jughead, was released in October 2015 as part of Archie Comics’ New Riverdale. It is written by Chip Zdarsky with artwork by Erica Henderson. Derek Charm took over as regular artist starting with issue #7.

Jughead V3 #9C Variant NM- $24
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Locke & Key Grindhouse (2012)

Locke & Key is written by Joe Hill, illustrated by Gabriel Rodríguez and published by IDW Publishing. Set in the glare of a Depression-era summer, in which three Canuck gangsters carry out a heist and hide out at the Keyhouse. Locke & Key: Grindhouse includes an expanded ‘Guide to Keyhouse,’ which describes the mansion.

Locke & Key Grindhouse #1 NM- $12

Pacific Presents (1982)

The Rocketeer’s first adventure appeared in 1982 as a backup feature in issues #2 and #3 of Mike Grell‘s Starslayer series from Pacific Comics. Two more installments appeared in Pacific’s showcase comic Pacific Presents #1 and 2. The fourth chapter ended in a cliffhanger that was later concluded in a special Rocketeer issue released by Eclipse Comics. The complete story was then collected by Eclipse in a single volume titled The Rocketeer. It was published in three versions: a trade paperback edition, a trade hardcover, and a signed, limited edition hardcover. Noted fantasy author Harlan Ellison, a fan of the Rocketeer and also an acquaintance of Dave Stevens, wrote the introduction to the collection; both Dave Stevens and Harlan Ellison signed the limited edition on a specially bound-in bookplate.

The story was continued in the Rocketeer Adventure Magazine. Two issues were published by Comico Comics in 1988 and 1989; the third installment was not published until 1995, six years later by Dark Horse Comics. All three issues were then collected by Dark Horse into a glossy trade paperback titled The Rocketeer: Cliff’s New York Adventure that quickly went out-of-print.

Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom (2010)

The Locke children have grown accustomed to the myriad magical keys discovered within the ancenstral family home of Keyhouse. The have also grown accustomed to tragedy. What they may not be prepared for is just how closely danger stalks their every move as Lucas Caravaggio, alias Kack Wells, continues his relentless quest for the key to the black door. New keys and old specters join the story as innocence is lost and determination is forged.

Captain Marvel Adventures (1946)

Whiz Comics #2 (cover-dated Feb. 1940) was published in late 1939. The comic’s lead feature introduced audiences to Billy Batson, an orphaned boy who, by speaking the name of the ancient wizard Shazam, is struck by a magic lightning bolt and transformed into the adult superhero Captain Marvel. Shazam’s name was an acronym derived from  the six immortal elders who grant Captain Marvel his superpowers:   SolomonHerculesAtlasZeusAchilles and Mercury.

In addition to introducing the main character, his alter ego, and his mentor, Captain Marvel’s first adventure in Whiz Comics #2 also introduced his archenemy, the evil Doctor Sivana, and found Billy Batson talking his way into a job as an on-air radio reporter with station WHIZ. Captain Marvel was an instant success, with Whiz Comics #2 selling over 500,000 copies.[2] By 1941, he had his own solo series, Captain Marvel Adventures, while he continued to appear in Whiz Comics, as well as periodic appearances in other Fawcett books, including Master Comics.

Captain Marvel Adventures #68 VF $149

The Badger – Capital Comics (1983)

The Badger was originally published by the short-lived Capital Comics company and then First Comics. He was created by writer Mike Baron in 1983 and published through the early 1990s in a titular series that ended when First Comics also ceased all publications. Since the ongoing series ended in 1991, new Badger titles have been released through Dark Horse ComicsImage Comics and IDW Publishing.

Shock SuspenStories (1952)

Shock SuspenStories was part of the EC Comics line in the early 1950s. The bi-monthly comic, published by Bill Gaines and edited by Al Feldstein, began with issue 1 in February/March 1952. Over a four-year span, it ran for 18 issues, ending with the December/January 1955 issue.

Front covers were by Feldstein, Wally WoodJohnny CraigGeorge Evans and Jack Kamen. Kamen was the comic’s most prolific artist, usually doing the lead eight-page story in each issue. Other stories were illustrated by Craig, Evans, Wood, Graham IngelsJack DavisAl WilliamsonJoe OrlandoReed CrandallBernard Krigstein and Frank Frazetta. Writing was handled by Gaines and Feldstein exclusively through the first 12 issues with the exception of a single story written by Craig. Over the last 6 issues other writers that contributed included Carl Wessler, Otto Binder, and Jack Oleck.

Issue 13 featured “Squeeze Play”, the only solo story Frank Frazetta drew for EC.

Shock Suspenstories #15 G+ $65

Cyberfrog V1 Harris (1996)

In an attempt to spead peace and knowledge throughout the universe, a plan was formed to send out unseeded energy masses to distant planets inside high technology living sentient robots, known as the Sinn. The Sinn was to be the ‘first parent’. On Earth, a human was to be the ‘second parent’.Aboard the vessel named Kjell Sinn was the energy mass named Trikk Rhan, the son of Sicha Rhan and his mate Kjell Rhan.

A crash landing on Earth in a swamp caused the energy mass to release early. As it leaked out, the Sinn was the first contact as planned. But the energy mass of Trikk Rhan came into contact with a bullfrog. The result was a surly hero who enjoys fried chicken, caffeine and violence.

Cyberfrog #2 Harris NM $29

Radioactive Man V1 (1994)

Radioactive Man was one of the four “premiere” series released by Bongo Comics in late 1993. The series has been released in two volumes, an early run from 1993–1994, and the current run that’s been going on since 2000. Smaller Radioactive Man stories have also been published in Simpsons Comics. As a tie-in promotion of The Simpsons Movie a special “Radioactive Man Comic Book Edition #711” was sold at 7-Elevens as part of their Kwik-E-Mart promotion.

Ripley’s Believe It or Not!

For generations, Ripley’s Believe It or Not! told tales of the bizarre and uncanny, but which “were absolutely true—believe it or not!” In doing so, Ripley has introduced readers to everything from child prodigies who composed masterpieces before they turned 12, to great islands built by people throwing pebbles off into the water over a period of several generations.

In this series, previously entitled “True War Stories,” Ripley tends to stretch the bounds of credibility. Readers who do not dispute the existence of spirits may have trouble believing these thrilling tales of ghost ships, hauntings, and other supernatural phenomena. Then again, Ripley has always known how to tell a good yarn—whether you believe it or not!