The Man of Steel (1986)

The Man of Steel is a 1986 limited series featuring Superman. Written and drawn by John Byrne, the series was presented in six issues which were inked by Dick Giordano. The series told the story of Superman’s modern origin, which had been rebooted with the 1986 series Crisis on Infinite Earths.

DC editors wanted to make changes to the character of Superman, including making him the sole survivor of his home planet Krypton, and Byrne’s story was written to show these changes and to present Superman’s origin. The series includes the baby Kal-El rocketing away from the destruction of Krypton, Clark Kent as a teenager in Smallville learning that he was found in a crashed space ship, his being hired at the Daily Planet in Metropolis, the creation of his secret identity of Superman, his first meeting with fellow hero Batman, and how he finally learned of his birth parents and from where he came. The series also included the reintroduction of a number of supporting characters, including fellow reporter and love interest Lois Lane and archenemy Lex Luthor, who was re-branded from a mad scientist to a powerful businessman.

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Deadpool: The Circle Chase (1993)

In 1993, Deadpool received his own miniseries, titled The Circle Chase, written by Fabian Nicieza and penciled by Joe Madureira. It was a relative success and Deadpool starred in a second, self-titled miniseries written in 1994 by Mark Waid, pencilled by Ian Churchill, and inked by Jason Temujin Minorand Bud LaRosa. Waid later commented, “Frankly, if I’d known Deadpool was such a creep when I agreed to write the mini-series, I wouldn’t have done it. Someone who hasn’t paid for their crimes presents a problem for me.”

In The Circle Chase, Deadpool must make his way through a battalion of mercenaries in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. Little does he know that Weapon X is lying in wait to take him down!

Masters of the Universe V3 (2004)

The comic book studio MVCreations produced numerous Masters of the Universe comics during the promotion of the 2002-2004 toy line.  MVCreations is a studio headed by Val Staples, originallly publishing through Image Comics. Following their success with the Masters of the Universe license, the two companies parted ways. MVCreations soon partnered with CrossGen Comics. Despite obtaining the license of two Don Bluth properties, as well as publishing a horror comic by Rob Zombie, the studio failed to off-set financial problems, in part due to CrossGen’s own financial downturn. The studio parted ways with CrossGen and became a full publisher on their own. As Hasbro’s enthusiasm in the Masters of the Universe property faded, MVCreations returned to publishd under Image Comics.

Green Lantern Corps – Recharge (2005)

The series was written by Geoff Johns and Dave Gibbons and illustrated by Patrick Gleason. The series starred several members of the Green Lantern Corps, a fictional intergalactic police force in the DC Universe, and was one of two follow-ups (the other being a fourth volume of Green Lantern, with Hal Jordan as the main character) to the mini-series Green Lantern: Rebirth, which had been published earlier in 2005. It is notable for featuring the first appearances of Soranik NatuVath Sarn and Isamot Kol, members of the Green Lantern Corps that would serve as recurring characters in future Green Lanterns storylines written by Johns and other writers.

All New X-Men V1 (2013)

Marvel Comics announced All-New X-Men by the creative team of Brian Bendis and Stuart Immonen in July 2012. Bendis stated that the idea of having the five original members of the X-Men (AngelBeastCyclopsIceman and Jean Grey) see what has become of the X-Men came to him during a company retreat for Avengers vs. X-Men, “Avengers Vs. X-Men led to it. It was an idea that had been floating around the X-Office for a while and I’m still unclear where exactly it percolated. I’m a big fan of these kinds of stories, Pleasantville or Peggy Sue Got Married, where a character faces the truth about themselves and what their life can mean versus what it does mean.” Bendis said that the five original X-Men not only come into contact with the present day Cyclops’s team of X-Men but with Wolverine’s team of X-Men as well, “We’ll have three factions, and all these characters are interacting. It’s almost like a Robert Altman movie. Plus, there will also be some new characters that you haven’t met before.”

Justice League V2 (2011)

In April of 2015, DC began “Justice League: The Darkseid War”, which would be the final installment in Geoff Johns five year run of Justice League. The event consisted of 10 Justice League issues, 6 one-shots, and one Special issue. The story took hidden elements from John’s run as well as answering all questions posed since the beginning.

 

Ghost in the Shell- Dark Horse (1995)

In this cyberpunk iteration of a possible future, computer technology has advanced to the point that many members of the public possess cyberbrains, technology that allows them to interface their biological brain with various networks. The level of cyberization varies from simple minimal interfaces to almost complete replacement of the brain with cybernetic parts, in cases of severe trauma. This can also be combined with various levels of prostheses, with a fully prosthetic body enabling a person to become a cyborg. The heroine of Ghost in the Shell, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is such a cyborg, having had a terrible accident befall her as a child that ultimately required that she use a full-body prosthesis to house her cyberbrain. This high level of cyberization, however, opens the brain up to attacks from highly skilled hackers, with the most dangerous being those who will hack a person to bend to their whims.

 

Amazing Fantasy V2 (2004)

The second volume of Amazing Fantasy ran 20 issues (cover-dated Aug. 2004 – June 2006). The first arc ran through vol. 2, #1–6 and featured a new teenaged heroine, Araña. The second arc, in vol. 2, #7–12, published after a short hiatus, featured a revamped, female version of the supervillain the Scorpion. A back-up feature in vol. 2, #10–12 (Sept.-Nov. 2005) starred the character Nina Price, Vampire by Night Vol. 2, #13–14 (both Dec. 2005) led with the modern-West feature “Vegas”, backed up by “Captain Universe

The cover to #15 was a revamped version of the original Amazing Fantasy #15 cover, complete with Spider-Man swinging through a modern-day New York City, while the new heroes watch in awe in the background.

The final arc, in vol. 2, #16–20 (Feb.-June 2006), introduced Death’s Head 3.0, a revamp of the Marvel UK character, written by the original version’s creator, Simon Furman. Issues #18–19 contain two “Tales of the New Universe” stories as backup features, while #20 featured a Western backup, “Steamrider”

 

Poison Elves (1990’s)

I, Lusiphur (December 1991-December 1992) – Poison Elves (February 1993-February 1995) Hayes originally self-published the series during the early 90s under his company Mulehide Graphics under the title of I, Lusiphur. The title was changed to Poison Elves because the similarity of Lusiphur to Lucifer led to the misconception that the series was Satanic in nature. Sales were reported to have increased significantly after the name change. Drew claimed in one of his Starting Notes that the name change was prompted by a letter from a teen-aged fan whose mother had thrown out his comics after finding I, Lusiphur comics amongst his collection.

The first ten issues of the Mulehide series were published in a larger magazine size format. In 1995, Drew Hayes signed on with Sirius Entertainment, a move that increased his exposure, fan base, and publishing rate. To date, ten trade paperbacks have been released, but the last issue of the main series published by Sirius was #79. Hayes died in 2007, thus bringing the series to an abrupt end. A commemorative issue #80 was released to give fans a look at sketches and plans Drew Hayes had for the future of the series before his death.

Lobo: Infanticide (1992)

They’re galactic pariahs – the rejected and downtrodden scum of the universe: hated an despised by all. They’re the legion of illegitimate children of Lobo…and they’re none too fond of dear old daddy. But when Su, one of his daughters, unites a hundred spawn of Lobo to get revenge on their marauding pop, she must choose their plan of attack carefully, making sure that Lobo is in a certain place at a certain time…so she arranges to have Lobo drafted! Written by Keith Giffen and Alan Grant, with art and cover by Giffen.