Iron Age

Creepy – Harris (1992)

Posted on

Harris Comics brings the old Warren magazine back from the dead, as it were, in this monstrous 1993 title. Creepy follows a familiar format, telling horror stories interspersed with comments from ghoulish hosts—in this case a sadistic couple of cousins. The stories hark back to the great EC horror titles such as Tales From the Crypt, featuring all number of vampires, witches, demons, and dark sorcery. And of course, there’s always Vampirella.

If there is one way in which Creepy sets itself apart from old-style horror, it’s that in classic horror comics, evil was (almost) always punished, and good always won out in the end. Creepy, on the other hand, makes no such distinction—preferring, as it might say, to be an “equal opportunity destroyer.”

New X-Men (2004)

Posted on Updated on

After the end of Grant Morrison‘s run on X-Men vol. 2 titled New X-Men, the title was used for a new series, New X-Men: Academy X. The title was later shortened to simply New X-Men.

New X-Men: Academy X was launched during the X-Men ReLoad event. The Academy X subtitle was dropped from the title when the new creative team of Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost took over the series with issue #20.

Whereas the other X-Men comics mostly deal with established adult mutants, this series concentrates on the lives of young students residing at the Xavier Institute for Higher Learning as they learn to control their powers.

After the 2007 crossover X-Men: Messiah Complex, the New X-Men title was canceled and briefly relaunched as Young X-Men for 12 issues. The series was written by Marc Guggenheim. After the first arc of Young X-Men, the characters began appearing in the pages of Uncanny X-Men. With the cancellation of Young X-Men the characters were folded onto the main X-Men books, appearing most prominently in the pages of X-Men: Legacy, Wolverine and the X-Men, and most recently, in X-Men.

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born (2007)

Posted on Updated on

The Gunslinger Born is an expansion and interpretation of events covered in The Dark Tower series, beginning with Roland Deschain‘s manhood test against Cort and ending with the last events of the flashback sequences in Wizard and Glass. Later arcs will “cover the time period between Roland leaving Hambry and the fall of Gilead“. The Gunslinger Born is followed by The Long Road Home, whose first issue was released on March 5, 2008.

Space Ghost (2005)

Posted on Updated on

The origin of Space Ghost. Six issue mini-series written by Joe Kelly. Painted covers by Alex Ross. Learn how Space Ghost got his power bands and why he protects the galaxy from evil! Witness the tragic circumstances that led to his donning a cowl and his first battle with archnemesis Zorak!

Mars Attacks V1 (1994)

Posted on Updated on

In conjunction with the expanded Mars Attacks trading card set released in 1994, Topps issued a six-issue limited comic book series written by Keith Giffen and drawn by Charles Adlard. The series featured a “flip-cover” format, with 22 pages of the book following the story of the card set and six pages detailing previous encounters leading up to the invasion. The limited series was successful and led Topps to continue it as a regular series.

Ms. Marvel V2 (2006)

Posted on Updated on

Carol Danvers, the first character to use the moniker Ms. Marvel, first appeared in Marvel Super-Heroes #13 (March 1968) by writer Roy Thomas and artist Gene Colan as a non-superpowered officer in United States Air Force. After being caught in an explosion with the Kree superhero Captain Marvel in Captain Marvel #18 (November 1969), Danvers resurfaces in Ms. Marvel #1 (January 1977) with super powers as result of the explosion which caused her DNA to merge with Captain Marvel’s. As Ms. Marvel, Danvers becomes a mainstay of the superhero team, The Avengers beginning in The Avengers #171 (May 1978). Danvers goes on to use the codenames Binary and Warbird. In July 2012, Danvers assumes the mantle Captain Marvel in honor of its dead, original holder, Mar-Vell, after Captain America tells her that Mar-Vell would want her to have it.

Ms. Marvel V2 #43 NM $19

Ghost in the Shell- Dark Horse

Posted on Updated on

In this cyberpunk iteration of a possible future, computer technology has advanced to the point that many members of the public possess cyberbrains, technology that allows them to interface their biological brain with various networks. The level of cyberization varies from simple minimal interfaces to almost complete replacement of the brain with cybernetic parts, in cases of severe trauma. This can also be combined with various levels of prostheses, with a fully prosthetic body enabling a person to become a cyborg. The heroine of Ghost in the Shell, Major Motoko Kusanagi, is such a cyborg, having had a terrible accident befall her as a child that ultimately required that she use a full-body prosthesis to house her cyberbrain. This high level of cyberization, however, opens the brain up to attacks from highly skilled hackers, with the most dangerous being those who will hack a person to bend to their whims.