Venom: Separation Anxiety (1994)

Eddie Brock and the alien parasite are now held at very distant locations from one another. His five spawns created by the Life Foundation show up and bust Eddie out, because they want him to teach them how to control their symbiotes. They also take Daily Bugle reporter Ken Ellis (disguised as Eddie’s doctor) hostage. The Venom symbiote also breaks free and escapes. It travels from host to host trying to find Eddie and rebond with him. Meanwhile, Eddie and Ellis escape, and as the other five symbiotes try to find him, someone stabs and kills Agony. The others believe the murderer is Brock and Phage convinces the others to find and kill him.

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Doomsday: Year One (1995)

Doomsday: Year One is a 1995 comic book one-shot annual, which tells stories about the character of Doomsday. Thus far, it is the only comic book released which is entirely about Doomsday. In this issue, Doomsday meets Darkseid for the first time and fights the Green Lantern Corps.

Doomsday – Year One #1 NM $8

Secret Invasion – X-Men (2008)

When the alien Skrull army attacks San Francisco, they do not expect the X-Men to realiate, but the Skrulls counter with a devious attack, and the X-Men must decide whether to save thousands or condone a genocide.

Fantastic Four (1990’s)

Writer-artist Walt Simonson took over as writer of Fantastic Four with #334 (December 1989), and three issues later began pencilling and inking as well. With brief inking exceptions, two fill-in issues, and a three-issue stint drawn by Arthur Adams, Simonson remained in all three positions through #354 (July 1991).

Simonson, who had been writing the team comic The Avengers, had gotten approval for Reed and Sue to join that team after Engelhart had written them out of Fantastic Four. Yet by The Avengers #300, where they were scheduled to join the team, Simonson was told the characters were returning to Fantastic Four. This led to Simonson quitting The Avengers after that issue. Shortly afterward, he was offered the job of writing Fantastic Four. Having already prepared a number of stories involving the Avengers with Reed and Sue in the lineup, he then rewrote these for Fantastic Four. Simonson later recalled that working on Fantastic Four allowed him the latitude to use original Avengers members Thor and Iron Man, which he had been precluded from using in The Avengers.

After another fill-in, the regular team of writer and Marvel editor-in-chief Tom DeFalco, penciller Paul Ryan and inker Dan Bulanadi took over, with Ryan self-inking beginning with #360 (Jan. 1992). That team, with the very occasional different inker, continued for years through #414 (July 1996). DeFalco nullified the Storm-Masters marriage by retconning that the alien Skrull Empire had kidnapped the real Masters and replaced her with a spy named Lyja. Once discovered, Lyja, who herself had fallen for Storm, helped the Fantastic Four rescue Masters. Ventura departed after being further mutated by Doctor Doom. Although some fans were not pleased with DeFalco’s run on Fantastic Four, calling him “The Great Satan”, the title’s sales increased over the period.

 

 

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1993)

Bram Stoker’s Dracula, a four-issue Topps comic book adaptation of Columbia Pictures’ (Sony Pictures Entertainment) 1992 film directed by Francis Ford Coppola which starred a young Keanu Reeves as Jonathan Harker, Winona Ryder as Mina Murray, Anthony Hopkins as Professor Abraham Van Helsing and Gary Oldman as Dracula. Topps Comics released a 120-page adaptation in 1993, written by Roy Thomas and drawn by Mike Mignola, one of the last projects before launching Hellboy.

 

Batman (1980’s)

Frank Miller‘s limited series The Dark Knight Returns (February–June 1986), which tells the story of a 55-year old Batman coming out of retirement in a possible future, reinvigorated the character. The Dark Knight Returns was a financial success and has since become one of the medium’s most noted touchstones. The series also sparked a major resurgence in the character’s popularity.

That year Dennis O’Neil took over as editor of the Batman titles and set the template for the portrayal of Batman following DC’s status quo-altering miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. O’Neil operated under the assumption that he was hired to revamp the character and as a result tried to instill a different tone in the books than had gone before. One outcome of this new approach was the “Year One” storyline in Batman #404–407 (February–May 1987), in which Frank Miller and artist David Mazzucchelli redefined the character’s origins. Writer Alan Moore and artist Brian Bolland continued this dark trend with 1988’s 48-page one-shot Batman: The Killing Joke, in which the Joker, attempting to drive Commissioner Gordon insane, cripples Gordon’s daughter Barbara, and then kidnaps and tortures the commissioner, physically and psychologically.

The Batman comics garnered major attention in 1988 when DC Comics created a 900 number for readers to call to vote on whether Jason Todd, the second Robin, lived or died. Voters decided in favor of Jason’s death by a narrow margin of 28 votes (see Batman: A Death in the Family). The following year saw the release of Tim Burton‘s Batman feature film, which firmly brought the character back to the public’s attention, grossing millions of dollars at the box office, and millions more in merchandising.

Deadpool V4 (2016)

Eight months after the events of Secret Wars and the restoration of Earth, Deadpool is seen working for Steve Rogers. After stealing some potentially life-saving chemicals needed by an ailing Rogue, he is offered membership in the Avengers Unity Squad.

In the course of the following months, Deadpool’s popularity skyrocketed after the mercenary Solo impersonated him to piggyback on Deadpool’s reputation and take jobs at a higher pay rate. One of Solo’s jobs in Washington, D.C. had Deadpool’s public opinion drastically change for the better when he saved an ambassador from his telepathically-manipulated agents. After learning of Solo’s impersonation, Deadpool came up with the idea to form a group of mercenaries called the Mercs for Money to extend his reach across the globe. However, Deadpool’s newfound popularity forced him to leave his family behind, fearing his enemies could endanger them. Deadpool additionally joined the Avengers Unity Division and used his popularity as a means of funding the team, with the profit from merchandise.

Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris (2011)

Dejaj Thoris is a prominent character in Dynamite Entertainment‘s 2010-11 comic miniseries Warlord of Mars, based on A Princess of Mars. She first appears in issue 4. Dejah Thoris is also the main character of the Dynamite spinoff comic Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris, which ran 37 issues. Set 400 years before A Princess of Mars, the first story arc portrays Dejah’s role in the rise to power of the Kingdom of Helium, as well as her first suitor. The second story arc will depict her as the “Pirate Queen of Mars”, other story arcs are: “The Boora Witch”, “The Pirate Men of Saturn”, “The Rise of the Machine Men”, “The Phantoms of Time”, and “Dual to the Death”. Each were collected into a trade paperback. The entire series is being collected into a series of omnibus volume, the first collecting the first 20 issues. There was also 2 other mini-series, the 4-issue Dejah Thoris and the White Apes of Mars (2012) and the 12-issue Dejah Thoris and the Green Men of Mars (2013–14).

Warlord of Mars Dejah Thoris #6 NM- $34

Justice League of America V2 (2006)

One year after the events of Infinite Crisis, Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman reunite in the Batcave to re-form the League in Justice League of America #0, the kick-off for a new series by Brad Meltzer and Ed Benes. The series featured a roster which included Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), Black Canary, Red Arrow (Green Arrow‘s former sidekick), Red Tornado, Vixen, Black Lightning, and Hawkgirl. The first arc of the series focused upon Red Tornado and pitted the team against a new intelligent incarnation of Solomon Grundy and the rebuilt Amazo. The new incarnation of the team has two main headquarters, linked by a transporter. At the first site is The Hall, which in the mainstream DC Universe is a refurnished version of the Justice Society of America and the All-Star Squadron‘s former headquarters located in Washington, D.C.. Black Canary is elected as the first official Chairperson after the fight against Amazo and Solomon Grundy, and led both the Justice League and Justice Society in a complex quest to reunite time-lost members of the pre-Crisis Legion of Super-Heroes, who had been sent back in time to free both Bart Allen and Flash from the other dimensional realm of the Speed Force. Meltzer left the series at the end of issue #12, with one of his subplots (Per Degaton, a pre-nuclear fire mutation version of Despero, and a circa 1948 version of the Ultra-Humanite gathering for an unknown plot) resolved in the pages of Booster Gold.

Sonic Universe (2009)

Sonic Universe was published by Archie Comics in association with Sega, based on the latter’s video game series of the same name. It is a spin-off of Archie’s Sonic comic book series, and shared continuity with that title. Sonic Universe centers on several characters featured throughout the franchise and comics, including Shadow the HedgehogBlaze the CatSilver the Hedgehog.