Deadpool: The Circle Chase (1993)

In 1993, Deadpool received his own miniseries, titled The Circle Chase, written by Fabian Nicieza and penciled by Joe Madureira. It was a relative success and Deadpool starred in a second, self-titled miniseries written in 1994 by Mark Waid, pencilled by Ian Churchill, and inked by Jason Temujin Minorand Bud LaRosa. Waid later commented, “Frankly, if I’d known Deadpool was such a creep when I agreed to write the mini-series, I wouldn’t have done it. Someone who hasn’t paid for their crimes presents a problem for me.”

In The Circle Chase, Deadpool must make his way through a battalion of mercenaries in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. Little does he know that Weapon X is lying in wait to take him down!

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Silver Surfer V1 (1968)

The Silver Surfer debuted as an unplanned addition to Fantastic Four #48 (March 1966). The comic’s writer-editor, Stan Lee, and its penciller and co-plotter, Jack Kirby, had by the mid-1960s developed a collaborative technique known as the “Marvel Method“: the two would discuss story ideas, Kirby would work from a brief synopsis to draw the individual scenes and plot details, and Lee would finally add the dialog and captions. When Kirby turned in his pencil art for the story, he included a new character he and Lee had not discussed. As Lee recalled in 1995, “There, in the middle of the story we had so carefully worked out, was a nut on some sort of flying surfboard”. He later expanded on this, recalling, “I thought, ‘Jack, this time you’ve gone too far'”. Kirby explained that the story’s agreed-upon antagonist, a god-like cosmic predator of planets named Galactus, should have some sort of herald, and that he created the surfboard “because I’m tired of drawing spaceships!” Taken by the noble features of the new character, who turned on his master to help defend Earth, Lee overcame his initial skepticism and began adding characterization. The Silver Surfer soon became a key part of the unfolding story.

 

Logan’s Run (1977)

Marvel Comics published Logan’s Run in 1977, with George Pérez drawing five issues between January and May 1977, with “acceptable” sales. The comics adapted the film’s story in five issues and briefly continued beyond. In his art, Pérez sought to follow the art direction of the film. The book was cancelled after issue #7 in July 1977.

All New X-Men V1 (2013)

Marvel Comics announced All-New X-Men by the creative team of Brian Bendis and Stuart Immonen in July 2012. Bendis stated that the idea of having the five original members of the X-Men (AngelBeastCyclopsIceman and Jean Grey) see what has become of the X-Men came to him during a company retreat for Avengers vs. X-Men, “Avengers Vs. X-Men led to it. It was an idea that had been floating around the X-Office for a while and I’m still unclear where exactly it percolated. I’m a big fan of these kinds of stories, Pleasantville or Peggy Sue Got Married, where a character faces the truth about themselves and what their life can mean versus what it does mean.” Bendis said that the five original X-Men not only come into contact with the present day Cyclops’s team of X-Men but with Wolverine’s team of X-Men as well, “We’ll have three factions, and all these characters are interacting. It’s almost like a Robert Altman movie. Plus, there will also be some new characters that you haven’t met before.”

Amazing Fantasy V2 (2004)

The second volume of Amazing Fantasy ran 20 issues (cover-dated Aug. 2004 – June 2006). The first arc ran through vol. 2, #1–6 and featured a new teenaged heroine, Araña. The second arc, in vol. 2, #7–12, published after a short hiatus, featured a revamped, female version of the supervillain the Scorpion. A back-up feature in vol. 2, #10–12 (Sept.-Nov. 2005) starred the character Nina Price, Vampire by Night Vol. 2, #13–14 (both Dec. 2005) led with the modern-West feature “Vegas”, backed up by “Captain Universe

The cover to #15 was a revamped version of the original Amazing Fantasy #15 cover, complete with Spider-Man swinging through a modern-day New York City, while the new heroes watch in awe in the background.

The final arc, in vol. 2, #16–20 (Feb.-June 2006), introduced Death’s Head 3.0, a revamp of the Marvel UK character, written by the original version’s creator, Simon Furman. Issues #18–19 contain two “Tales of the New Universe” stories as backup features, while #20 featured a Western backup, “Steamrider”

 

Iron Man (1980’s)

Tony Stark’s health deteriorates, and he discovers the armor’s cybernetic interface is causing irreversible damage to his nervous system. His condition is aggravated by a failed attempt on his life by Kathy Dare, a mentally unbalanced former lover, which injures his spine, paralyzing him.[68] Stark has a nerve chip implanted into his spine to regain his mobility.[69] Stark’s nervous system continues its slide towards failure, and he constructs a “skin” made up of artificial nerve circuitry to assist it. Stark begins to pilot a remote-controlled Iron Man armor, but when faced with the Masters of Silence, the telepresence suit proves inadequate. Stark designs a more heavily armed version of the suit to wear, the “Variable Threat Response Battle Suit”, which becomes known as the War Machine armor. Ultimately, the damage to his nervous system becomes too extensive.

The Infinity Gauntlet (1991)

The Infinity Gauntlet is a six-issue limited series published by Marvel Comics from July to December in 1991. The series was written by Jim Starlin and penciled by George Pérez and Ron Lim.

The storyline is the culmination of events from Silver Surfer vol. 3, #34 (Feb. 1990) and the two-issue miniseries The Thanos Quest (Sept.- Oct. 1990).

Thanos mounts the six Infinity Gems (collected in the Thanos Quest limited series) on his left glove to form the titular Infinity Gauntlet. Each Gem grants its bearer complete mastery over one aspect of the multiverse: Time, Space, Mind, Soul, Reality, and Power. Now all-powerful and desperate to win the affections of Death, Thanos decides to offer the entity a gift of love by completing a task she had given him, erasing half the sentient life in the universe (including most of the X-Men, Daredevil, and the Fantastic Four), quite literally with a snap of his fingers.

Additional plotlines not addressed in the main story were featured in other books published during the same time period.

The storyline led to two sequel miniseries, Infinity War and Infinity Crusade. All three series were the core of a company-wide crossover story.

Secret Invasion (2008)

Secret Invasion” is a crossover storyline that ran through a self-titled eight issue limited series and several tie-in books published by Marvel Comics from April through December 2008.

The story involves a subversive, long-term invasion of Earth by the Skrulls, a group of alien shapeshifters who have secretly replaced many superheroes in the Marvel Universe with impostors over a period of years, prior to the overt invasion. Marvel’s promotional tagline for the event was “Who do you trust?”

X-Men (Silver Age)

Early X-Men issues introduced the original team composed of Cyclops, Marvel Girl, BeastAngel and Iceman among a few others, their archenemy Magneto and his Brotherhood of Evil Mutants featuring Mastermind, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, and Toad. The comic focused on a common human theme of good versus evil and later included storylines and themes about prejudice and racism, all of which have persisted throughout the series in one form or another. The evil side in the fight was shown in human form and under some sympathetic beginnings via Magneto, a character who was later revealed to have survived Nazi concentration camps only to pursue a hatred for normal humanity. His key followers, Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch, were Romani. Only one new member of the X-Men was added, Mimic/Calvin Rankin, but soon left due to his temporary loss of power.

The title lagged in sales behind Marvel’s other comic franchises. In 1969, writer Roy Thomas and illustrator Neal Adams rejuvenated the comic book and gave regular roles to two recently introduced characters: Havok/Alex Summers (who had been introduced by Roy Thomas before Adams began work on the comic) and Lorna Dane, later called Polaris (created by Arnold Drake and Jim Steranko). However, these later X-Men issues failed to attract sales and Marvel stopped producing new stories with issue #66, later reprinting a number of the older comics as issues #67–93.

Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham Vol 1 – Book 4: The Golden Age (2016)

At New York Comic Con 2013, Marvel announced that they had solidified their rights to Miracleman and that Neil Gaiman would finish the story he had started 25 years earlier. The series is being reprinted in a giant-sized format, with each issue containing a reprint of the corresponding issue of the Eclipse Comics series, reprints of select Mick Anglo Marvelman stories, and non-fiction material such as essays, photos, and Marvelman design sketches. The first issue, reprinting the recolored and relettered stories from Warrior #1 & 2/Miracleman #1, was released on January 15, 2014.

The reprints continued, collecting remastered and recolored work of the original run, with hardcover collections following, and in September 2014 the first new Miracleman material under the Marvel Comics banner was announced. Featuring a ‘lost’ story by Grant Morrison that he wrote in the 1980s, and drawn by Joe Quesada, it will be joined by a brand new story by Peter Milligan and Mike Allred.

The reprints proceed through #16 when the series was retitled Miracleman: The Golden Age which reprinted issues 17-22. Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham: The Silver Age issues 1 to 3 were announced for release in 2017.