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Hello and welcome to EHT Comics! Thank’s for taking the time to stop by our site. All of the items posted on our site are scans or photos of the actual items we have for sale. Just click on an item to view a larger and more detailed image. E-mail us anytime at EHTcomics@gmail.com in regards to items that you are interested in and a Paypal Invoice will be provided via email. See “About Us” for shipping information. We are always adding new comics, so if you don’t see it, feel free to ask. Thanks again!

Vampirella (1969)

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Vampirella is a vampire superheroine created by Forrest J Ackerman and costume designer Trina Robbins in Warren Publishing‘s black-and-white horror comics magazine Vampirella #1 (Sept. 1969). Writer-editor Archie Goodwin later developed the character from horror-story hostess, in which capacity she remained through issue #8 (Nov. 1970), to a horror-drama leading character. Vampirella was ranked 35th in Comics Buyer’s Guide‘s “100 Sexiest Women in Comics” list.

 

Amazing Spider-Man (1990’s)

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With a civilian life as a married man, the Spider-Man of the 1990s was different from the superhero of the previous three decades. McFarlane left the title in 1990 to write and draw a new series titled simply Spider-Man. His successor, Erik Larsen, penciled the book from early 1990 to mid-1991. After issue #350, Larsen was succeeded by Mark Bagley, who had won the 1986 Marvel Tryout Contest and was assigned a number of low-profile penciling jobs followed by a run on New Warriors in 1990. Bagley penciled the flagship Spider-Man title from 1991 to 1996.

Issues #361-363 (April–June 1992) introduced Carnage, a second symbiote nemesis for Spider-Man. The series’ 30th-anniversary issue, #365 (Aug. 1992), was a double-sized, hologram-cover issue with the cliffhanger ending of Peter Parker’s parents, long thought dead, reappearing alive. It would be close to two years before they were revealed to be impostors, who are killed in #388 (April 1994), scripter Michelinie’s last issue. His 1987–1994 stint gave him the second-longest run as writer on the title, behind Stan Lee.

 

 

New Gods V1 – Bronze Age

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Created and designed by Jack Kirby, The New Gods first appeared in February 1971 in New Gods #1.

Kirby’s production assistant of the time, Mark Evanier, remarked that: “Folks forget but the New Gods saga was intended to be a limited series … There was no intention that these characters would go on forever. After Jack’s books started getting good sales figures, DC demanded that we keep them going and use guest stars like Deadman, which we were very much against doing. So Kirby had this novel he was forever stuck in the middle of – he could never get to the last chapter. … You can spot the issues where Jack kind of gave up trying to advance the story of Darkseid and Orion and was marking time. If those books had been intended from the start to run indefinitely, they would have been done very differently.”

New Gods #1 marks the first appearance of Orion, Highfather, and Metron, among others.

From Hell

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From Hell is a graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell, originally published in serial form from 1989 to 1996 and collected in 1999. Set during the Whitechapel murders of the late Victorian era, the novel speculates upon the identity and motives of Jack the Ripper. The novel depicts several true events of the murders, although portions have been fictionalised, particularly the identity of the killer and the precise nature and circumstances of the murders. The title is taken from the first words of the “From Hell” letter, which some authorities believe was an authentic message sent from the killer in 1888.

Green Lantern V4 (2005)

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The fourth volume of Green Lantern began in 2005 in the aftermath of Green Lantern: Rebirth, which saw the return of fan favorite Hal Jordan. In the beginning of the series Hal tries to re-acclimate into society and life, both as Hal Jordan: Test Pilot and Hal Jordan: Green Lantern of Sector 2814. As critically acclaimed writer Geoff Johns reinvents Hal Jordan and reintroduces him into the DCU he comes across various problems and threats throughout the run. With Coast City being rebuilt Hal takes residence there, even if barely anyone else has. The Manhunter Androids, Cyborg-Superman, Shark, Hector Hammond and Black Hand cause serious problems for Hal. The Black Hand who becomes immensely important later on in the series.

Deadpool: The Circle Chase (1993)

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In 1993, Deadpool received his own miniseries, titled The Circle Chase, written by Fabian Nicieza and penciled by Joe Madureira. It was a relative success and Deadpool starred in a second, self-titled miniseries written in 1994 by Mark Waid, pencilled by Ian Churchill, and inked by Jason Temujin Minorand Bud LaRosa. Waid later commented, “Frankly, if I’d known Deadpool was such a creep when I agreed to write the mini-series, I wouldn’t have done it. Someone who hasn’t paid for their crimes presents a problem for me.”

In The Circle Chase, Deadpool must make his way through a battalion of mercenaries in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. Little does he know that Weapon X is lying in wait to take him down!

The Shadow: Blood and Judgement (1986)

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In 1986, another DC adaptation of The Shadow was developed by Howard Chaykin. This four issue mini-series, The Shadow: Blood and Judgement, brought The Shadow to modern-day New York. While initially successful, this version proved unpopular with traditional Shadow fans because it depicted The Shadow using Uzi submachine guns and rocket launchers, as well as featuring a strong strain of black comedy and extreme violence throughout.