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Spawn (2000’s)

While Wanda lies close to death, Spawn returns to the eighth level of Hell for a final showdown with a weakened Malebolgia. At the height of the conflict, Angela arrives to join in the battle. After mortally wounding Malebolgia and thinking him dead, Spawn and Angela prepare to escape; however, with his last breath, Malebolgia extracts Angela’s lance and impales her with it. In a rage, Spawn decapitates Malebolgia with Angela’s sword. Carrying Angela’s lifeless body, Spawn delivers her to a host of angels who offer him forgiveness and redemption. He refuses this angelic pardon, but the angel who offers it can yet do one favor for Spawn: She appears in Wanda’ hospital room and breathes new life into Wanda. Meanwhile, Spawn finally comes to terms with his place in the world.

The Shadow V1 (1973)

During the mid-1970s, DC Comics published an “atmospheric interpretation” of the character by writer Dennis O’Neil and artist Michael Kaluta in a 12-issue series (Nov. 1973 – Sept. 1975). Kaluta drew issues 1–4 and 6 and was followed by Frank Robbins and then E. R. Cruz. Attempting to be faithful to both the pulp-magazine and radio-drama character, the series guest-starred fellow pulp fiction hero the Avenger in issue #11.

The Shadow: Blood and Judgement (1986)

In 1986, another DC adaptation of The Shadow was developed by Howard Chaykin. This four issue mini-series, The Shadow: Blood and Judgement, brought The Shadow to modern-day New York. While initially successful, this version proved unpopular with traditional Shadow fans because it depicted The Shadow using Uzi submachine guns and rocket launchers, as well as featuring a strong strain of black comedy and extreme violence throughout.

Thanos (2004)

In 2004 Thanos received an eponymous title that ran for 12 issues. After defeating the Hunger, Thanos went to the frontline and gave himself up to the Omega Corps. After a panicked action from the corps they send him to the Kyln. On his way he killed a Skrull agent to give them a reason to imprisoned him. On Kyln, a priest told him about the prison while Thanos is watching the Crunch. When the Priest left, Death appeared and talked to him, telling him She loves him in her way, and that he hadn’t given her anything that she didn’t already have.

The Witching Hour (1969)

The series was published for 85 issues from February–March 1969 to October 1978. Its tagline was “It’s 12 o’clock… The Witching Hour!” and was changed to “It’s midnight…” from issue #14 onwards. The series was originally edited by Dick Giordano, who was replaced by Murray Boltinoff with issue #14. Nick Cardy was the cover artist for The Witching Hour for issues #1–6, 11–12, 15–16, 18–52, and 60. Stories in the comic were “hosted” and introduced by three witches, Morded, Mildred, and Cynthia.

After The Witching Hour’s cancellation as a result of the “DC Implosion“, the title was merged with The Unexpected until issue #209. The witches were later revived along with the hosts of the companion series House of Secrets and House of Mystery as important characters in Neil Gaiman‘s The Sandman.

Venom: Funeral Pyre (1993)

Writen by Carl Potss, Penciled by Tom Lyle and Inked by Scott Hanna, Al Milgrom and Joe Rubinstein, Venom: Funeral Pyre was a three-part series published between August and October 1993. The story continued Brock’s adventures in San Francisco, dealing with street gangs in an uneasy alliance with the Punisher, and saw the creation of the villain Pyre.

Doctor Solar Man of the Atom – Gold Key (Silver Age)

Doctor Solar premiered in issue #1 of Doctor Solar, Man of the Atom in Summer 1962 (cover date October 1962) in the first batch of comics released by Gold Key, with Solar being Gold Key’s first original character. Though Gold Key did not have as large a distribution network as Dell Comics, the Gold Key comics stood out on the newsstand shelves due to their cover art and a 12 cent price (Dell Comics sold for 15 cents). The first two issues of Solar appeared with cover paintings by Richard M. Powers; beyond the second issue the cover paintings were done by George Wilson. The interior artwork in the first several issues also had unique features: the superhero, Dr. Solar, did not have a costume until the fifth issue, rectangular word balloons and no black holding line around each panel. Following from practise of Dell Comics, and thanks to Western Publishing’s reputation of publishing other children-friendly books, Doctor Solar, Man of the Atom was able to be distributed without the Comics Code Authority symbol. The original creative team of writer Paul S. Newman and artist Bob Fujitani lasted until issue #5 when Frank Bolle took over the art work. With the exception of issue #7 written by Otto Binder, Newman wrote the comic book until issue #10 when Dick Wood took over for the remainder of the series. Other artists that contributed included Mel Crawford, Win Mortimer, Alden McWilliams (issues #20-23), Ernie Colón (issues #24-26), José Delbo (issue #27).

Secrets of Haunted House (1970’s)

The series began in April–May 1975. Like its predecessor Secrets of Sinister HouseSecrets of Haunted House was originally “hosted” by Cain, AbelEve, and Destiny who had moved over from Weird Mystery Tales. By issue #10 (Feb.–March 1978), Destiny was the only one of these who remained a regular. In issue #40 (Sept. 1981), Abel returned with no further mention of Destiny.

Secrets of Haunted House Special was published in 1978 as part of the DC Special Series umbrella titleSecrets of Haunted House was a temporary victim of the “DC Implosion.” With issue #14 (Oct.–Nov. 1978), it was cancelled but revived a year later with issue #15 (Aug. 1979). The title continued until issue #46 (March 1982).

Fantastic Four (Silver Age)

The Fantastic Four debuted in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961), which helped to usher in a new level of realism in the medium. The Fantastic Four was the first superhero team created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby, who developed a collaborative approach to creating comics with this title that they would use from then on. As the first superhero team title produced by Marvel Comics, it formed a cornerstone of the company’s 1960s rise from a small division of a publishing company to a pop culture conglomerate.

Justice League of America V5 – Rebirth (2017)

Starting in February 2017 as part of DC Rebirth’s second wave, a new Justice League of America series was released. The team consists of the AtomVixen, the Ray, and Killer Frost. The month prior to this, each of these members received a one-shot issue. On October 28, it was revealed that Batman, Black Canary, and Lobo would be joining the team as well. Batman will have a dual membership in both Justice League teams. This series ended in April 2018 with the release of issue #29.