Hello and welcome to EHT Comics! Thank’s for taking the time to stop by our site. All of the items posted on our site are scans or photos of the actual items we have for sale. Just click on an item to view a larger and more detailed image. E-mail us anytime at EHTcomics@gmail.com in regards to items that you are interested in and a Paypal Invoice will be provided via email. Shipping information is provided under “About Us” on the right. We are always adding new comics, so stop back often and if you don’t see it, feel free to ask. Thanks!

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Cosmic Odyssey (1988)

Cosmic Odyssey is a science fiction mini-series, first published in 1988 by DC Comics. It was a four-issue limited series written by Jim Starlin, penciled by Mike Mignola and lettered by John Workman. The story tells a story spanning the DC Universe involving a wide variety of major characters including Superman, Batman, and the New Gods.

The series comprised four 48-page prestige format comic books.

The Sensational She-Hulk (1989)

She-Hulk regained a solo series in 1989, The Sensational She-Hulk (maintaining the 1985 graphic novel‘s title). The Sensational She-Hulk ran for sixty issues. Issues #1 to #8, #31 to #46, and #48 to 50 were written and drawn by Byrne. Byrne’s She-Hulk stories satirized comic books and introduced She-Hulk’s awareness that she is a comic book character. Two issues tested the limits of the comics code: #34 makes reference to the 1991 Vanity Fair cover in which actress Demi Moore appeared nude and pregnant (She-Hulk’s version has her holding a green beach ball to imitate Moore’s pregnancy); in issue #40 She-Hulk is entirely naked with her breasts and genital area covered by blur lines as she is depicted jumping rope in the nude. Other writers to contribute to this series include Steve Gerber (#10, 11, 13–23), Simon Furman, and Peter David.

Batman Adventures V1 (1992)

Based on Batman: The Animated Series, the first series ran for 36 issues, 2 annuals, and 3 specials (Mad Love and Holiday Special, which were both adapted into episodes for The New Batman Adventures, plus an adaptation of the Batman: Mask of the Phantasm movie). The first annual introduces Roxy Rocket, who would later appear in The New Batman Adventures episode “The Ultimate Thrill” and the Superman: The Animated Series episode “Knight Time”. Most of the issues were written by Kelley Puckett, and illustrated by Mike Parobeck and Rick Burchett, though Ty Templeton did the writing and art on a few issues. Mad Love was written by Paul Dini and illustrated by Bruce Timm, while the holiday special was written and illustrated by a number of creative people who had worked on the animated series, including Paul Dini, Bruce Timm, Glen Murakami, Dan Riba, and Kevin Altieri.

 

Amazing Fantasy V2 (2004)

The second volume of Amazing Fantasy ran 20 issues (cover-dated Aug. 2004 – June 2006). The first arc ran through vol. 2, #1–6 and featured a new teenaged heroine, Araña. The second arc, in vol. 2, #7–12, published after a short hiatus, featured a revamped, female version of the supervillain the Scorpion. A back-up feature in vol. 2, #10–12 (Sept.-Nov. 2005) starred the character Nina Price, Vampire by Night Vol. 2, #13–14 (both Dec. 2005) led with the modern-West feature “Vegas”, backed up by “Captain Universe

The cover to #15 was a revamped version of the original Amazing Fantasy #15 cover, complete with Spider-Man swinging through a modern-day New York City, while the new heroes watch in awe in the background.

The final arc, in vol. 2, #16–20 (Feb.-June 2006), introduced Death’s Head 3.0, a revamp of the Marvel UK character, written by the original version’s creator, Simon Furman. Issues #18–19 contain two “Tales of the New Universe” stories as backup features, while #20 featured a Western backup, “Steamrider”

Eightball (1989)

Eightball is an alternative comic book series written and drawn by Daniel Clowes. The first issue was published by Fantagraphics Books in 1989, soon after the end of Clowes’s previous comic series, Lloyd Llewellyn. It has consistently been among the best-selling independently authored comics.

Adventure Comics (Silver Age)

Adventure Comics was published by DC Comics from 1938 to 1983 and revived from 2009 to 2011. In its first era, the series ran for 503 issues (472 of those after the title changed from New Adventure Comics), making it the fifth-longest-running DC series, behind Detective Comics, Action Comics, Superman, and Batman. It was revived in 2009 by writer Geoff Johns with the Conner Kent incarnation of Superboy headlining the title’s main feature, and the Legion of Super-Heroes in the back-up story. It returned to its original numbering with #516 (September 2010). The series finally ended with #529 (October 2011), prior to DC’s The New 52 company reboot.

Tales to Astonish (Silver Age)

Tales to Astonish was published from January 1959 to March 1968 . It began as a science-finction anthology that served as a showcase for such artists as Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko. It became The Incredible Hulk with issue #102 (April 1968). Its sister title was Tales of Suspense.

Following his one-shot anthological story in #27 (Jan. 1962), scientist Henry Pym returned donning a cybernetic helmet and red costume, and using size-changing technology to debut as the insect-sized hero Ant-Man in #35 (Sept. 1962). The series was plotted by Lee and scripted by Lieber, with penciling first by Kirby and later by Heck and others. The Wasp was introduced as Ant-Man’s costar in issue #44 (June 1963). Ant-Man and Pym’s subsequent iteration, Giant-Man, introduced in #49 (Nov. 1963), starred in 10- to 13-page and later 18-page adventures,

The Hulk, whose original series The Incredible Hulk had been canceled after a six-issue run in 1962-63, returned to star in his own feature when Tales to Astonish became a split book at issue #60 (Oct. 1964),]after having guest-starred as Giant-Man’s antagonist in a full-length story the previous issue. The Hulk had proven a popular guest-star in three issues of Fantastic Four and an issue of The Amazing Spider-Man. His new stories here were initially scripted by Lee and illustrated by the seldom-seen team of penciler Steve Ditko and inker George Roussos. This early part of the Hulk’s run introduced the Leader, who would become the Hulk’s nemesis, and this run additionally made the Hulk’s identity known, initially only to the military and then later publicly.

 

 

Harley Quinn V2 (2013)

On July 16, 2013, DC announced that a new Harley Quinn ongoing comic book series would begin publication in November 2013, co-written by Amanda Conner and her husband Jimmy Palmiotti, cover illustrated by Conner, and story illustrated by Chad Hardin. The series has notably become distanced from the “Batman Family” of DC publications in both tone and premise, with Harley no longer having any significant connection to either Batman or the Joker following the “Death of the Family” storyline. In the series, Harley Quinn has become a landlady at Coney Island, is a part-time member of a roller derby team and has returned to her work in psychology under her real alias, indicating that Harley’s real identity is not public knowledge in the new status quo.

Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham Vol 1 – Book 4: The Golden Age (2016)

At New York Comic Con 2013, Marvel announced that they had solidified their rights to Miracleman and that Neil Gaiman would finish the story he had started 25 years earlier. The series is being reprinted in a giant-sized format, with each issue containing a reprint of the corresponding issue of the Eclipse Comics series, reprints of select Mick Anglo Marvelman stories, and non-fiction material such as essays, photos, and Marvelman design sketches. The first issue, reprinting the recolored and relettered stories from Warrior #1 & 2/Miracleman #1, was released on January 15, 2014.

The reprints continued, collecting remastered and recolored work of the original run, with hardcover collections following, and in September 2014 the first new Miracleman material under the Marvel Comics banner was announced. Featuring a ‘lost’ story by Grant Morrison that he wrote in the 1980s, and drawn by Joe Quesada, it will be joined by a brand new story by Peter Milligan and Mike Allred.

The reprints proceed through #16 when the series was retitled Miracleman: The Golden Age which reprinted issues 17-22. Miracleman by Gaiman & Buckingham: The Silver Age issues 1 to 3 were announced for release in 2017.

Jupiter’s Legacy (2013)

Jupiter’s Legacy is influenced by Star WarsKing KongRoman mythology and origin stories from the Golden Age of Comics. It is written as Millar’s treatise on superheroes’ connection to the American ideal. The first few issues of the opening story arc explores the generational conflict between a group of aging superheroes known as the Union, who used the powers they gained in 1932 for the betterment of mankind, in particular their leader, Sheldon Sampson (aka the Utopian), and their children, who are daunted by the prospect of living up to their parents’ legacy. Other conflicts and themes in the book include sociopolitical and economic differences among the older heroes and the end of capitalism, in the form of Sheldon’s differences with his brother, Walter, which were inspired by Millar’s reaction to the Great Recession.